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    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Justcurioustwo, May 11, 2021.

    1. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Well-Known Member

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      In my crude diagram the calculated pulling force on the cable is 118,428 pounds.

      How can I convert this to watts?
      just asking

      :)-
       
    2.  
    3. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      Watts is a measure of Power. That is a rate of doing work.
      Or Energy/unit time.

      Work is a force through a distance.

      So you need to know how fast the thing is moving, and how much distance it moves.

      To make it simpler on yourself, don't worry about calculating power. Just calculate the energy into and out of your system as is makes one complete cycle.
      Start with ONE balloon full of compressed air at the bottom. Let it expand and rise. Then figure out how much energy it takes to take the same amount of expanded air at atmospheric pressure at the surface and compress it and push it back down to the bottom to inflate another balloon.
       
    4. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Well-Known Member

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      Thanks for going along with this discussion.

      Gas Type Capacity Price
      Compressed Air Any Capacity Up to 207 bar $5

      https://divingpicks.com/how-much-does-it-costs-to-fill-a-scuba-tank/

      You are currently converting Pressure units from Bar to Psi
      207 Bar (bar)
      =

      3002.28117 Psi (Psi)
      https://www.theunitconverter.com/bar-to-psi-conversion/207-bar-to-psi.html

      The example (drawing) I have been using compresses the air down to 15 ATM or 220. Psi. Again, in my example there are 12 balloons tied together that are moving up. This would mean I spent ($5) X 12 = $60 dollars to charge them all. Once the system is completely charged all I have to do is recharge the lowest one (1) to keep it running

      :)-
       
    5. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Well-Known Member

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      You mentioned the speed of the rising bubbles—

      It depends on the size of the bubble. By playing around with bubbles in water, you can see for yourself that small bubbles rise very slowly, while large bubbles go much more quickly. Champagne bubbles have speeds of millimeters per second, while a bubble the size of a baseball may rise at several meters per second.
      http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/1997-08/865365227.Ph.r.html
      :)-
       
      Last edited: Feb 27, 2022
    6. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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    7. sakshi verma

      sakshi verma Member

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      For more precise analysis and monitoring, we can always make use of modern and scientific devices. By using these devices we can easily rely on the results.
      As far as fluid mechanics is concerned we can it covers the subdisciplines of fluids, liquids, and gases.
       
    8. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Well-Known Member

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      [QUOTE="sakshi verma, post: 28162, member: 40186"]For more precise analysis and monitoring, we can always make use of modern and scientific devices. By using these devices we can easily rely on the results.
      As far as fluid mechanics is concerned we can it covers the subdisciplines of fluids, liquids, and gases.
      [/QUOTE]
      I have been trying to get people who are engineers to evaluate the energy potential of the SeaEngine. I have had some success, at first posters called it a perpetual motion machine and would not spend a few minutes to review it.

      Now I have found a few who are at least considering it. I have now gotten to the point where real numbers are being used to determine its viability. So far so good.
       
    9. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      Nah. Its still a perpetual motion machine. You clearly do not have the knowledge and training to analyze the situation for yourself, so a few people are throwing out breadcrumbs so you might have a chance to analyze your own system and see that it cannot produce excess power. Your concept is simple enough. Go build a small scale model that can work in an 8 foot deep swimming pool. Report back on how much force the lift generates, and how much electricity it takes to run the air compressor.
       
    10. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      We have evaluated it and quickly concluded that it won't work.

      As for the post you were responding to, I hate to break it to you but it was a spambot.
       
    11. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Well-Known Member

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      "We" I was hoping for something more than a quickie

      Wasn't that your post-?
       

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