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  • Advice me on which CAD software to buy for my startup company.

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by Harshith, Jun 28, 2014.

    1. Harshith

      Harshith New Member

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      Hi all,
      I want to buy a CAD software, 3D and 2D, for my startup company, but I am confused on which one to go for. I have worked before on both Creo and SolidWorks. I do not have much to spend, so I am looking to buy only one software having good 3D and 2D capabilities. We design and manufacture home appliances.
       
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    3. CPPMable

      CPPMable Well-Known Member

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      Hi,

      How much do you have budgeted? What key features are you looking for from both 3d and 2D? Parametric relations, rendering, ect
       
    4. K.I.S.S.

      K.I.S.S. Well-Known Member

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      CAD software

      Hi,

      Basically, you get what you pay for (unless it's pirate software, but please don't do that...)
      Personally, the most important consideration is that the software is intuitive - I've used lots of programs that simply didn't work for me, owing to little niggles. Things like the Icon image/descriptor not being clear, or the simple fact that I want the mouse wheel to zoom the image in when I scroll it towards me.
      If you're relatively new to any CAD package, you'll have enough obstacles to overcome, without the program putting virtual 'roadblocks' in front of you every step of the way.
      So, despite all the gripes I have with SolidWorks, it would still be my No.1 choice. It's very intuitive, versatile and powerful.
      If you're designing home appliances I'd imagine that you will require good sheet metal tools, and SW is very good at this.

       
    5. JamieLill

      JamieLill Member

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      Dont take any more responses Just by Solidworks best cad system out there.
       
    6. sconnell

      sconnell New Member

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      If you are going to be doing any complex surfacing go with Creo/Pro E, otherwise go with Solidworks. Solidworks is easier to get started with but does not handle complex geometries as well. Regardless, you will be fine with either of these choices.

      Steve
       
    7. kaaron

      kaaron New Member

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      SolidWorks is widely used and affordable for small businesses and has plenty of capability.
       
    8. Camid

      Camid Well-Known Member

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      Hi Harshith
      Solidworks - if only for the fact that you will need to share data with others who will probably use SW. We have used it since 1998 - not without its issues and bugs! But gets the job done.

      One alternative if cost is an issue - Autodesk Fusion 360. Very promising CAD system but no 2d option currently.

      Good luck!
       
    9. PeterB

      PeterB Member

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      Despite the fact that I've been a Solidworks user, pretty well since it was launched and would highly recommend it for ease of learning and use, that doesn't mean it, or any other particularly popular brand is right for your needs.

      Firstly you need to buy into something that fits with your particular requirements and your industry. If you work with suppliers or supply to others, then you may have to be closely connected to whatever they want to use and it could be an 'industry standard' CAD system.

      If much of what you need to do is sheet metal, Swks, Solid Edge and some others can all give you some highly useful tools. But more specialist tools for carrying out particular types of forming may be available from other CAD systems.

      If you depend on Class A surfacing and organic forms, then those too might be best sourced from an alternative system.

      So first list out all the things you require from your CAD system and get them checked over and demonstrated to your satisfaction by sellers, before being persuaded by these suppliers that this is the next best thing since sliced bread. It may be, but if it doesn't do your particular job quickly, easily and efficiently, then it will not be a good choice for you and will lead to frustration.

      Just spend your budget wisely, whatever level it is. Go to some shows, see some demos, get hands-on for a decent time and take your decision slowly and with all the info to hand.
       
    10. srdfmc

      srdfmc Well-Known Member

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      I do agree with Peter.

      SW is the best CAD/CAE soft if you have the right budget for it and use its mechanical engineering features. Otherwise, be advise that a lot of its content will be of no use for you. More over, Dassault-System appears to have completely neglected their SME/independent basis by doing nothing on the issue of Pirate copies and non-licensed usage.

      As a low level mechanical user (I mean in term of technicality) you will come heads on competing with individuals using pirated copies of SW/CATIA as Web freelancer. Hard to make a margin that way, I tell you.

      So I strongly advise you to narrow your buy in function of what will make the diff on your market. Rendering, BoM, architectural compatibility, 3D model integration, is what comes to my mind after a few seconds. But you'll certainly get more in the details.


      Oh and by the way, I do work with SW. It's a terrific package for what I do but the limits are there as exposed. I didn't buy Comsol at the time for exactly the same reasons... What for ?
       
      Last edited: Sep 20, 2014
    11. K.I.S.S.

      K.I.S.S. Well-Known Member

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      Peter8 wrote a thoughtful and well thought through reply to your original request - and it was also spelt correctly and grammatically accurate, much unlike some (one) of the recent comments prior to it... It's good advice, but the only addendum I would add is that you originally stated that monetary considerations play a part, so make sure that whatever program you choose is capable of saving and converting your files to multiple different and universal types - in my experience the most popular universal types are parasolid (X.T. and X.B.) and IGES types.
      For most sheet metal, certainly for the majority of domestic appliances, high precision surfacing is not usually a major issue, and if it is, get your part supplier to work on it for you.

      Have a look at some of the freeware out there - it might just do what you need it too. It probably won't do what you want it to, but there's a big difference between want and need....
       

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