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  • Alloy wheel design

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by king-panther, Dec 21, 2013.

    1. king-panther

      king-panther Member

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      Hello all, this is my first post. Does anyone here know where I can find the information of how to design alloy wheels?
       
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    3. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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    4. king-panther

      king-panther Member

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    5. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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      A good design starts off with a detailed design specification - and moves forward from there. In "very general terms" - there are often many standards that you have to refer to - in order to build up the complete picture of what is required for your particular design - whatever that may be. More often than not - one standard refers to several other standards. This requires quite a bit of effort to track down all the necessary standards you require - and unfortunately a lot of expense in order to acquire all the necessary standards you need. Life would be easy - if we got everything on a plate - but unfortunately it isn't that way.

      Have you done what I suggested above - and began to track down all the necessary standards - for your particular application - whether it is truck wheels or car wheels or whatever - but also check which regulatory body you have to comply with - for the particular part of the world you are using the product? So from your latest posting - I am unsure of what the "problem" is?


      http://www.autoparts-standard.org/index/images/userfiles/media/SAE J1204v001.pdf
       
    6. king-panther

      king-panther Member

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      The manufacture will ensure the wheel meets TUV certification; I just have to provide the design. Obviously I would like to do as much of the work as possible. Thanks for the information and seems to be a good place to start but I need to find a guide of how to design the alloy wheel.
       
    7. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      The requirements in those standards tell you the magnitude of the loads and the number of cycles they must withstand. As the responsible design engineer you must choose your materials and manufacturing process. This will let you determine the materials tensile and fatigue properties. The applied loads from the standards combined with material properties and stress analysis of your part will tell you when the shape and size of your wheel will be capable of passing the tests. Lastly, I learned on the first day of my first engineering course that "Design is an iterative process". Good luck.
       
    8. aaslerecruitment

      aaslerecruitment Member

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      Yes , I am agree to this views "The requirements in those standards tell you the magnitude of the loads and the number of cycles they must withstand. As the responsible design engineer you must choose your materials and manufacturing process. This will let you determine the materials tensile and fatigue properties. The applied loads from the standards combined with material properties and stress analysis of your part will tell you when the shape and size of your wheel will be capable of passing the tests. Lastly, I learned on the first day of my first engineering course that "Design is an iterative process". Good luck."
       
    9. eckcop

      eckcop Member

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      king-panther, do you just mean the aesthetics and the manufacturer will do the engineering?

      Presuming that's what you mean, you could look for inspiration, e.g. other peoples designs, shapes from nature, turbines, mandalas, etc. Sketch out what you want (pencil and paper) scan it, rotate the pattern and apply fills to try and get the color you are after, shade it, add highlights in GIMP or photoshop, etc. Try cut and paste into an image of the vehicle you want the wheels to suit.

      Alternatively model the part in any 3D modeling software you are comfortable with.

      Either way would give you a rough concept, which you could send to the designer, with the requirements.

      If you really mean to design the alloy, see Erich's post above.
       
    10. king-panther

      king-panther Member

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      Thanks for all the help.
       

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