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  • AutoCAD, Inventor or Solid works which is better for a beginner?

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by gentlered, Apr 11, 2012.

    1. amores-design

      amores-design New Member

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      Dear Andrew, they are some 3D packages that not are good for engineering design or industrial design, like AutoCAD Mechanical Design 2012 or Inventor in the last version, this software save the files with the same extension DWG and you don't know if the file is a part, one assembly or one 2D file. I think that Autodesk must modify this details and use AutoCAD 3D only for architecture, And modify the last version of Inventor for save three types of files, design, part and assembly like the others software packages.
       
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    3. andrew_neil

      andrew_neil Active Member

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      Solidworks. I think it is a far better option.
      Thanks
       
    4. KarenL9

      KarenL9 Member

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      For design work in 3D, Solidworks is the best option. If you are creating 2D drawings for tools, manufacturing instructions and procedures AutoCAD provides everything you need. The licencing on standard AutoCAD is unpopular with companies, so SolidWorks is the preferred option for 2D drawings. As previous thread, old AutoCAD drawings are still in use. I've been converting old AutoCAD drawings by converting from one format to another to another and then using the result as a template for redrawing in 2D Solidworks.
       
    5. torstekn

      torstekn New Member

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      Use Onshape.com
      CAD in the cloud. Try it, you will be amazed. Free to use for small projects, and you only need a Chrome browser to get started.
       
    6. Christian Bédard

      Christian Bédard New Member

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      Solidworks is the most friendly user cas program that I used. Nx and catia can do a lot more but they are not intuitive and got less tutorial. Autocad is mostly for 2d and is not really user friendly. Inventor and solidedge are like solidworks. There is more business using solidworks and there is also more tutorial.
       
    7. Credence

      Credence New Member

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      I began design on the board back in the 60's, learned AutoCad in the early 80's, learned SolidWorks in '96 and have been using it ever since. I started my own Engineering Company in '99. I can honestly say that I would not be in business today had it not been for SolidWorks. I use it for developing products, developing manufacturing equipment and tooling, doing schematics, doing wiring diagrams, doing pneumatic diagrams, costing out projects, doing promotional videos, idea transfer, equipment/operator manuals and many other business related things that Inventor just can't do. SolidWorks owns the market. There are more prospective employers/customers who use SolidWorks than any other platform. Go right to the mainstay and get SolidWorks.
      Jim Ellis,
      President,
      Credence Engineering, Inc.
      480-993-8446
       
    8. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      As far as people's points about AutoCAD for 2D drawings, no one creates drawings like that anymore unless they have to. With a proper 3D package, like Solidworks, you'll output the same drawing, just in half the time and a quarter of the effort.

      The catch is that Solidworks is pretty pricey, especially for a new grad to buy for themselves. You might want to check out Onshape. You can get the equivalent of a basic licence for free, and, as I understand it, it's a fairly similar package to Solidworks, as far as fundamentals, and is improving rapidly.

      Really, it doesn't matter much which CAD program you learn (assuming you learn a proper CAD program, and not a drafting program like AutoCAD). Basic functionality is the same. Unless you're looking to be a guru, knowing all the hotkeys and such, transferring from one software to another is not that hard. As an engineer, the actual CAD work is only a fraction of what I do. If it takes you 10% longer to do the CAD work, it probably won't affect you too much.
       
    9. MechEng66

      MechEng66 New Member

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      If the thing is that you want to learn a 3D CAD just because you think you must or you want, then I will recommend you initiate with Auto Cad then continue with Solid Works due to intuitiveness and easier to learn, though the other 3D CADs are focused on specific industries like CATIA for aerospace industry, Creo formerly Pro/E on Automotive industry, it does not mean they are exclusively for such purposes, the same design done on all of them you will get the same thing at the end.

      My recommendation is start with Auto Cad so you will find out how to create the 2D drawings and the learning must include all the type of lines, the different views (third angle projection) including auxiliar views, all the symbols used by the industry like GD&T symbols. Then, with Solid Works or other 3D CADs, you will see all those topics are included and you will understand better why and where they come from. My comment is because I have seen some engineers with a huge lack of knowledge on 2D creation and blue print reading and when they create the 2Ds to be used for parts fabrication and/or assembly, people on the floor shop get confused or they make mistakes because they are doing assumptions. Just wanted to give you a clue on making final decision
       
    10. Raisa

      Raisa New Member

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      Go for SolidWorks! Dana was so right. You won't be sorry.
       
    11. nishagg

      nishagg Member

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      SolidWorks has always been the most user friendly software. But I guess it is costlier than inventor. Contact a VAR and get a quote.
      SolidWorks (Dassault Systemes) still offers their versions with a lifetime license. You only need to pay once for but this does not include upgrades or maintenance. And as a bonus it is used throughout industry. Even the top automotive and aerospace/defense corporations and government contractors use it. CATIA (also by Dassault Systemes) is also common among this group of customers for more complex tasks.

      Inventor (AutoDesk) used to offer lifetime licenses but no more. You now have to lease a license on an annual basis. That is now the trend not only in CAD/CAE but among most commercial software providers so don’t blame them for this. This means that you have to pay to use it once per year. But this automatically includes all maintenance and upgrades. The initial and continuing license fees are lower than that of SolidWorks but the overall cost will be higher when compounded over time. However it does not come close to covering the market that SolidWorks now covers but it is making strides.

      I am assuming that your real question is which application should I learn that will make me more marketable? If that is the case I recommend SolidWorks.
       

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