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  • axial flow and radial flow

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by durrani, Apr 11, 2014.

    1. durrani

      durrani Member

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      what is the difference between axial flow and radial flow compressor or say turbine. how and from where air enters and leaves. and video links, if possiable
      thanks
       
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    3. Chris Cantrell

      Chris Cantrell Member

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      An axial flow compressor is one in which the air flowing through the compressor flows parallel to the axis. This is how most compressors in modern jet engines operate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axial_compressor

      A radial flow compressor is one in which the air flows along a radial direction, perpendicular to the axis. With most radial flow compressors, the air enters along the axis, is compressed as it travels away from the axis in a radial direction, and then, in the case of a jet engine, must be turned again to be directed into the combustion chamber. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centrifugal_compressor

      You may be interested to know that the first jet engine ever created used a radial compressor, while quick iterations switched to axial compressors due to their higher efficiencies. Radial compressors are usually less efficient because during compression, the flowing air has to change directions several times, giving up valuable energy in the process, whereas with an axial compressor, the air travels straight through the compressor with less loss of energy. In addition, from an aircraft jet engine perspective, axial flow compressors required a larger frontal area creating more drag for the same thrust. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_jet_engine
       
    4. durrani

      durrani Member

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      thanks alot dear
       

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