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  • Calculating torque on hardened pins

    Discussion in 'Calculations' started by Vector Victor, Mar 29, 2012.

    1. Dan Pohly

      Dan Pohly Member

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      In general terms, yes. But don't forget about all the other items.
       
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    3. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      If your fit of the pin in hole is tight and accurate and there is no axial gap between the parts, you will APPROACH the same strength as one pin in double shear.

      if you get an axial gap, you will put the pin in bending. The stresses will go WAAAYYYY up and bad things will happen to your design.

      In general loading things in single shear is a bad design approach.
       
    4. Vector Victor

      Vector Victor Member

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      Not the case here. If shear or distortion of the pins occur in this design, the pins will have prevented damage from happening down the line in the more important (expensive) components. The pins are expendable and easily replaceable!
       
    5. vic.blackall

      vic.blackall Well-Known Member

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      You must consider a factor of safety. If you have two pins in one face and two mating holes for the pins in the other face, then this is the theoretical situation. In practice there will be positional tolerances with regards these two holes, and therefore the pins may be in a stressed situation just in the assembled state.
       
    6. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      Victor,

      I understand the pin is being used as a mechanical fuse. That use makes single shear a much worse design condition.

      In single shear, clearances in the holes, or variations in axial spacing of the two halves of the coupling can lead to bending stresses in the pins.
      The loading on the pin needs to be known accurately and consistently. Variations in mounting that lead to variations in the state of stress in the pin makes the whole thing much more complicated. The simple stress analysis being discussed here will be wrong and optimistic. A bad combination for an overload relief element.
       

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