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    Discussion in 'General jobs discussion' started by afidget, Nov 4, 2012.

    1. afidget

      afidget New Member

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      I am a recent grad, just trying to figure out some options at the moment. One of the things that I have been thinking about is what are the advantages of having a MS degree in engineering industry? Is there any particular preference over a job candidate with a Masters of Science vs. a candidate that has the MEng, I believe they term that the Masters of Engineering degree?


      I have heard previously that many engineers with master's wind up in management, and while that may or may not be the general case, I was just hoping to get insight from more professionals.


      I am also considering a masters degree to get my PE license a bit faster.

      Any input is appreciated and Thank You for it.
       
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    3. tonycro

      tonycro Well-Known Member

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      The majority of CV's that cross my desk are of candidates with Msc's/M.Eng, and I.MechE now reqire an Msc to fulfil their comptance requirements.

      Personally, I am disappointed with majority of candidates - not being to describe some of the basic mechanical principles during interview, and it is a complaint that can be levied at both BEng, Bsc and Masters candidates.

      And I'm doing my Msc now as a part time student, some 14yrs after graduating, it is damm sigght easier to do it in a year as a full time student.

      My advice, do it now while the opportunity is there and get it over with; otherwise you'll look like a lower qualified candidate than the majority, it'll be easier to reach c.eng with a masters and it is easier to be a student now than later whilst working.

      tony
       
    4. As an engineer you'll have a good chance of getting a research position which comes with a pay check, health insurance, probably tuition assistance, if not an out right full ride. What it comes down to is someone is basically offering to give you a Master's degree in exchange for 2-3 years of your life.
       
    5. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      You don't say where you are... it varies from country to country but typically in the US (you mention PE so I assume you're in the US) the degree will be a BS or MS (Bachelor or Master of Science) in a specific field of engineering (e.g. mechanical BSME, electrical BSEE, aerospace BSAE, etc.) I haven't heard of "Masters of Engineering", perhaps that's something common outside the US?

      Of course you can have a Master of Science in many other non-engineering fields, too, physics, chemstry, biology etc., even the many social pseudo sciences, and those are less useful to an engineer unless in a related field.

      As for the value of a masters vs. a bachelors degree, or even a PE license, it depends on the field you're in. A masters degree might give you a slightly higher pay, but whether that compensates for the additional expense of getting it is debatable. It might help getting a small percentage of jobs. The PE helps if you're designing bridges or skyscrapers, but means nothing in other industries. Real world engineers use less than 20% of what they learned in school on a regular basis, and I'm sure that percentage is lower for most of those with advanced degrees.
       
    6. D. Naukam

      D. Naukam Member

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      The masters degree will not get you to a PE faster than working after you get your bachelors degree will. They both count as experience gained.
      I would recommend getting a job with a company that will reimburse your education expenses and that will allow you to grow and utilize your degree. You can work for a while until you get your license and then get your maters to meet continuing education requirements.
      There have been discussions on the value of getting your license. It is used by a number of industries (civil projects, HVAC, power plants & refining among others) but many do not (manufacturing, auto, aviation). You may wish to determine your distant future goals and see if a license is required.
       
    7. mhjones12

      mhjones12 Well-Known Member

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      I agree, get work experience, it's all companies really care about. Check out:
      http://www.mechanicaldesignforum.com/showthread.php?1885-Advice-for-Engineering-Students
      http://www.mechanicaldesignforum.co...pany-Look-for-Most-in-an-Entry-Level-Engineer
      http://www.mechanicaldesignforum.com/showthread.php?2815-What-s-Wrong-with-having-a-PhD
       
    8. calligraphygirl

      calligraphygirl Member

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      Hi, I just want to share my point of view regarding an opportunity after having graduated an engineering course. Well, I am not one of those but a friend of mine who landed on the same course is now luckily on the same ground and successful indeed. Anyway, I think, anyone should not be in a hurry to get the best job easily. You just have to focus on what you have and be enthusiastic of whatever has been offered to you in the first place. Be reminded that an engineering graduate has always an edge , as along as you are determined with what you really want to achieve. There are a lot of companies offering a great package out there either. I hope you'll find one soon!
       

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