• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • copper grain structure

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by poesenior, Aug 7, 2012.

    1. poesenior

      poesenior New Member

      Joined:
      Mar 2012
      Posts:
      4
      Likes Received:
      0
      Can anyone tell me if annealed copper has a defined grain direction and, is so, how do you determine the direction?
       
    2.  
    3. BlueFeather

      BlueFeather New Member

      Joined:
      Mar 2012
      Posts:
      1
      Likes Received:
      0
      Not sure if this will help you but, copper has a Face-Centered-Cubic structure, making the copper pliable; bending the copper will cause dislocations within its atomic structure and the copper will stiffen, this process can be undone by annealing. Annealed copper is copper that has had it's inner stresses relieved. Essentially, annealed copped has no directional tensions, as it is "annealed", further working the copper will put those tensions back in, making the copper stiffer and stiffer as it is further worked. When tensions are being built into the copper via working, there may be directional stresses which are stiffer than another direction, the mere act of bending the copper to check tensions further changes the tensions within the copper.
       

    Share This Page