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  • cos, sin or tan

    Discussion in 'Calculations' started by chofer, May 14, 2013.

    1. chofer

      chofer Member

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      Good morning fellow blogsters, I have an question that relates to cos sin and tan, and if possible Microsoft exel, what I'm trying to do is making a cut sheet for building a bay window,

      Ok, a bay windows is a three part window with the sides situated at a 45 degree angle from the middle and what I need to figure out is the full width of the window and what I do know is the middle with and the side witdths(but remember sides are at a 45 degree) to figure out the whole with i have to use the angle (45 degree) and the width of the angled side (let's say a 24" flanker) so I do know the angles and the hypotenuse,

      If I'm not clear enough I can do an example drawing, please let me know!

      And how would I do that calculation or write that formula in exel?

      I wasn't good at trig, I never did pick it up so....

      Anyway, ill thank anyone for thier help!!!!!

      THaNK YOU
       
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    3. Ross' Workshop

      Ross' Workshop New Member

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    4. Allfat

      Allfat Member

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      https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B43MzPJXZDuZOXVSdFptLWlObk0/edit?usp=sharing

      Something like that?

      To get this in excel, the calculation would look something like this:

      Lets assume d is in cell A1 and c is in cell A2

      =2*(A1*SIN(RADIANS(45)))+A2

      This would return x in my drawing. The RADIANS is for Excel to convert from Degrees into Radians. It defaults to working in radians, but you can work around it by using that conversion function.
       
    5. chofer

      chofer Member

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      its absolutely perfect! i would have never never never ever figured out how to do it, thanks a million!
       
    6. Randall Wink

      Randall Wink Member

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      The answer is: (sqrt ((d^2)/2)*2) +c
      Theory: The length each side is 24†set at 45 degrees. Therefore the flat length of each side is 24†squared, then divided by 2 to get the square of each side, then take the square root to get the length. D^2=2*A^2 or D^2=2*B^2, A=B. So to get the overall length find the length of each side, multiply by 2 and add the center length.
       
    7. Corona

      Corona New Member

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    8. schaefer.don@gmail.com

      schaefer.don@gmail.com New Member

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      Good Afternoon Chofer,

      Because you are working with 45 degree angles this becomes a very easy calc and formula. Many trig classes unfortunately do not teach about "special" triangles, with a 45 degree being one of them. The length of the hypotenuse of any 45 degree triangle is the hypotenuse divided by the sq.root of 2. (no sin / cosine tables to deal with) So if you place the known values in cells A1 & A2 the formula for the total length of the window is fairly simple. [D= center length + ((side length / sqrt 2) * 2)]

      One way to do this in Excel would be with the formula "=A2+(A1/SQRT(2))*2" (withOUT the quotation marks at either end.

      1. Place this formula in the cell where you want the total linear length of the widow.
      2. In cell A1 place the actual flat length of one of the 2 sides (the hypotenuse of the triangle that represents that section
      of the window in a plan or world view.)
      3. In cell A2 place the actual flat length of the center section.

      hope this helps, email me back if you need more help with it.
      -ds
       

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