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  • Deciding which CAD software is best to learn next (After Solidworks)

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by Mathusan, Sep 2, 2012.

    1. Fredk

      Fredk New Member

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      Basically we use Solidwork or Pro/E for 3D model, and AutoCAD for 2D drawings. I think main difference between Asian engineers and European/American is software version. If you want read drawings or models from Asian engineers, you need relative new version, such as AutoCAD2010/2011, Solidwork2010, and etc.
       
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    3. frank

      frank New Member

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      As I know, in south of china , Pro/e is very popular for the big company.
       
    4. Franz_fladic

      Franz_fladic Member

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      not really recently. most of the user of Pro-E have been changed to use Solidwork or UG.
       
    5. mwrother

      mwrother New Member

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      This is probably a little late, but I would dump them both. Best in class and best "bang for the buck" Go with Solid Edge or if you can afford it, NX 8. Both come form Siemens. Both work well with each other and then there is the direct modeling part, it's like getting two or three CAD packages is one. No longer do you have to wonder if you I can import a Catia, Inventor, or even SolidWorks model and make changes effortlessly. Go with the best in Solid Edge or NX 8. you won't go wrong.... My late two-bits.
       
    6. andrew_neil

      andrew_neil Active Member

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      Autocad has always the upper hand.Because it has large online community and help forums.There are lot of people who are using this.
      Thanks
       
    7. Bob_S

      Bob_S Member

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      Obviously, anyone will choose their current software as the best. Especially if they've been using it a while and are familiar with it.

      To them it will be the best in class. Another designer may or may not agree, they will have their own familiar package which would be better.

      Assuming the choice of software is required for future career progress, then you should look at the industries that you are interested in and then look at their software choices.

      As a rule, the larger the industry or company, the more high end software they will choose. This is either because they believe it will do their job better, or the appropriate marketing team have persuaded them. Often they will follow the development path to minimise the impact on legacy data.

      Hence this is why AutoCAD users migrate to Inventor. SolidWorks (as you will be aware) has tried (and is still trying) to lure AutoCAD users to SW with their read and write capability of ACAD files; however the upward migration to CATIA isn't so clear, but then again, you may never need CATIA anyway! Similarly SolidEdge users migrate upwards to NX, however this is smoother than the SW to CATIA path. My impression is that the PROE/Creo environment has a loyal following, but fewer new take-ups - it could have a niche for esoteric reasons, but it wouldn't normally be something to focus on for a career boost.

      The smaller (by user count) packages like SpaceClaim etc. could be limiting to you, due to the reduced demand for the expertise (currently). So, while they may be accessible, you may find you won't get much exposure to the skills you gain from it.

      At the SW level, then the main competitors are Inventor and SolidEdge, and at this mid-range, the training can prove to be difficult to do cheaply, since their focus is on getting companies to train people and/or convert to them. CATIA and NX are a cost level higher and probably even harder for an individual. ACAD is not a direction to go in, as AutoDesk are preferring Inventor over it.

      Finally, you have to get access to the software, and we are all aware of the costs here, and you don't really want to be spending the money on software you'll never use again.

      Once again, look at the industries and companies you're interested in and learn whatever software they're using - at the end of the day, it's the interface you're learning must of the time, the techniques embedded in the ACIS/Parasolid kernels are fundamentally the same.
       
    8. OverFueled

      OverFueled Member

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      Well, Well here’s one for you. The "best" of both worlds.

      Well, Well here’s one for you.

      There are a few good packages that work well with SolidWorks. I have used about half of them on the market today. MasterCam, Camworks, Hypermill and HSM.

      If you are looking to learn with a very powerful package (free) then I would suggest HSM.
      You can make “Gâ€-Code for mills with many state of the art routines.

      There are many good reasons for going in this direction.
      1) It is the only software on the market today that has been built on a “New Kernelâ€
      2) It is now owned by Autodesk. Who is the full supporter of the software.
      3) It works inside of SW flawlessly. Not like some others that have loads of bugs.
      4) It is free for the 2-1/2 axis milling . All the rest cost loads of money so you can run any mill (generic Fanuc and others) with out purchasing a post for it.

      Now if this doesn’t get your mill going nothing will.

      I was surprised to find out that Autodesk is going to support this inside of its competitor SW.

      Good for you Autodesk keep up the good work.
       
    9. srdfmc

      srdfmc Well-Known Member

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      Simulation Pro rocks. In fact I think I have become increasingly confident with that Soft that I can handle most of the complex problem I am submitted. And I tell you, this is a sign that the soft have a strong basis (I didn't have the same feeling with CATIA V5 FEA module! - CAtia V6/Abaqus is another cat).

      However, I still miss my Cosmos solution. Powerful, ultra light, reasonably priced and... integrated (What SimPro share obviously).
       
      Last edited: Feb 16, 2014
    10. caddrafting

      caddrafting New Member

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      Goog Tutorial.........
      Thanks..!!!
       
    11. ShoN

      ShoN Active Member

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      Hi Mathusan

      Why do you want to jumping from one software product to another? If the person writes that he knows it for all 100%, it has to say that it isn't necessary to jump on another ON.

      How well you know SW? And what you mean by it?
       

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