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  • Define a "quality" product

    Discussion in 'Industrial design' started by GarethW, Sep 24, 2011.

    1. michmichyo

      michmichyo Member

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      Well this is not SO difficult to define, the problem we have is our point of view.

      As an engineer, a product with quality will be beautiful, efficient, low cost, need no maintenance....
      For a customer, it is what he/she wants.
      For someone in the street, this is something that will make him/her happy to have bought it.

      In fact, this is part of all these.
      First, the product is with quality BECAUSE it corresponds to what the customer WANTS, this is the main point.
      Then, as engineers, we have the duty to advise the customer on the requirements he/she formulates because we know the a customer cannot often define what he NEEDS.
      Finally, as the product will be both wanted AND needed, the customer will be happy.

      But each of us have a role in that. We cannot simply criticize the customer on a point (design/ engineering) which is not his "métier".

      Here is a good illustration of that topic
      [​IMG]
       
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    3. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Airplanes can't fly with a factor of safety of 2.0. So either a) no airplane is a quality product or b) there is a different definition of quality.

      Chris
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    4. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      A quality product, is robust enough to satisfies defined technical needs (reference is tolerances in technical drawing, or conditions defined on related technical spects, etc.) regardless of changing conditions (process or material variables, sometimes even room temperature)

      Altan
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    5. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      To define a "quality product" in my opinion is in the eyes of the beholder. For a given product each operator / user will have thier own set of criteria that defines a quality product.

      For me, from an "engineering" perspective a quality product is one that meets the engineering specifications and either meets or exceeds the requirements. For me, from an "end user" perspective a quality product is one that works everytime and meets my needs.

      Frank
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    6. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Quality needs to be quantified, good quality , poor quality, same quality, and then we need to determine from who’s point of view, a good quality product for some customers will last forever, others product may need to be biodegradable, and then the manufactures who are profit driven will only want it to last one day longer than the warranty. Have a look at this clip on u tube the light bulb conspiracy



      I think we should all have a look at this video before Quality needs to be quantified, good quality, poor quality, same quality, and then we need to we start the design of our next electronic consumable and think about consumer durables!

      Andrew
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      Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2016
    7. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      To michmichyo

      Well said and perfectly illustrated :D :D :D
       
    8. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Dear friends, there is a very beautiful definition of quality in ISO 9001, it goes like this "Quality of something is always relative. That is, it is the degree of conformance of product characteristics to expectations of the customer of the product. hence if there is high degree of conformance, then the product can be said to be of high quality and vice versa."

      Milind
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    9. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      A 'quality' product is something (in my opinion) that is used without thought. When you have designed something that the end user takes for granted, then you have achieved a quality product. Examples, iPod - looks great and does what you expect to do and a bit more. Dyson Cyclone - again looks good and works very well. Both of these are iconic and functional. Truly quality products.

      Stuart
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    10. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Yes, Milind, that is a classic 'trick' definition of 'quality':

      "Quality is conformance to requirements."

      The real question is, how do you understand the requirements?

      Btw, ISO9001 has NOTHING to do with quality, only 'Quality'. 'Quality' with a captial 'Q' is simply about following procedures (and a kind of guild system). I know any number of ISO companies which produce absolute rubbish. We all know where work-to-rule gets us.

      Adam
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    11. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Dear Adam,

      "Quality" in ISO 9001:2008 is not merely following procedures.

      It goes beyond that to ensure the "product" conforms to the customer expectations.

      Before ISO, the quality was understood to be defined unilaterally by the manufacturers/ providers of services.

      ISO has made it customer focused.

      To take a simple example, consider two mobile handsets. One with very high features and of high cost and second with basic features with low cost. Now for a customer looking for an economical handset, second one is a quality product and first is not and of course vice-a- versa.

      Now when you say "any number of ISO companies which produce absolute rubbish", it confirms the definition of Quality as per ISO. That is those products do not conform to your (customer) expectations. It is for the manufacturers/ service providers (because service is also a product) to understand their target customers and their expectations.

      Thanks.

      Milind
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