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  • Define a "quality" product

    Discussion in 'Industrial design' started by GarethW, Sep 24, 2011.

    1. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      The definition of quality is the totality of features that thad bear on a product or service's ability to satisfy an implied or stated need. Quality cannot simply be quantified into factor of safety or finish or how something feels when you take it out of a box.

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      Tom
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    3. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Satisfy customer needs and better than your competitor while at the same time, achieve its desired quality conformance and reliability.

      Chen
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    4. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      From my mech engineer's perspective: meeting or exceeding customer requirements (both internal and external) for functionality, performance, robustness, cost etc - i.e. it looks and performs like it should, and was built exactly as intended, therefore will last as expected/planned. From a gadget-buyers (and possibly the average consumer's) point of view, possibly it's the perceived quality: Is it worth paying full price for, and does it have enough kudos to tell my friends about...? Obviously that's a huge over-generalisation, but in this day of Ebay/online discounting/perpetual sales, consumer items that are bought at full price without question (Ipods, Dysons, high-end cars) etc stand out to me as having a perceived quality that the brand has developed over years. It may not actualy reflect reality. A bit like the annual Observer Cool list, quality (when considered outside the spheres of QMS/ISO9XXX etc) may be down to perception of the product's tangible but hard-to--put-your-finger-on attributes - i.e. does it feel heavy/solid/shiny/complicated enough to warrant my outlay, and will my wife understand why it cost so much...?

      Adam
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    5. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      The "quality" of a product is relative and applied from an end user. perspective.
      Quality is not quantitative and can never be.
      We, as engineers, can design for what we assume to be what would be perceived as quality to the end user but cannot standardize it.

      So, think like a consumer and what you want for that product at x price. Does it work when I need it to? Is it worth the price?

      Here is a different question... Why is it perceived that price determines quality? Does "quality" cost more?
      If so why not charge more to harbor the illusion of quality to your consumers?

      Anthony
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    6. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Anthony, fllowing your train of thought, there are plenty of well known 'premium' brands that use fundamentally generic internals (hi-fi, TVs, some cars..), packaged into premium (heavy, shiny, sculpted) casings/exteriiors, and charge a premium that may well exceed the real value of their additional parts. The actually functionality of the product, and the longevity, may not offer any real improvements of the basic, mass-market-branded versions, but the purchaser feels the weight and hears a satistying clunk, and is happy to buy the premium version in the belief it's better quality....

      Adam
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    7. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Anthony-

      You write: "Here is a different question... Why is it perceived that price determines quality? Does "quality" cost more?"

      This is a question that once bothered me greatly, and I have come to the conclusion that many, many people lack the ability to analyze "quality" and, therefore, rely on "public consensus" to define quality. For example, for years Cadillac has differed from Oldsmobile or Buick only cosmetically- most of the components used to build the different marques have come from the same sources- the only difference is in the "packaging" (which includes the marketing hype). So, the term "Cadillac of..." has come to mean "best of class" in the US. People gain status by over-paying for a product- "Look how successful I am- I can afford the more expensive option." One gains "bragging rights" based on how much one can afford to pay for something.

      Many years ago, I operated my business based on the idea that I could offer lower prices to customers by maintaining a low overhead. I discovered, accidentally, that business volume actually increased when I raised my prices, although the motivation was due to inflation, not an improved product (same service for higher price). Seems customers were saying to their associates, "Yeah, he's expensive, but he's worth it!", and new customers would use this as their primary judgement of "quality".

      Charles
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    8. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      In manufacturing, a measure of excellence or a state of being free from defects, deficiencies, and significant variations, brought about by the strict and consistent adherence to measurable and verifiable standards to achieve uniformity of output that satisfies specific customer or user requirements. ISO 8402-1986 standard defines quality as "the totality of features and characteristics of a product or service that bears its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs."

      Sumit
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    9. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Isn't it suppose to be "Traceability" & "Repeatability"with several "quality" checks in between?

      Jason
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    10. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Quality in marketing is defined as " serving multiple needs" a La Coste shirt is not only well made, of the best materials, stylish and warm but also a sign of wealth for instance and maybe a womens magnet? > so serving multiple needs (as many as possible).

      Wim
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    11. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      quality is like beauty, it is all in the eye of the beholder. All we can strive to do is to produce a product that will work as intended, and design it to last, our world is too full of throw away products.
      For example, Snap-on tools can be considered superior to Craftsman, yet both companies sell to a different segment, both have the value to the intended user.

      ISO standards, you have to remember are compiled by committee, and are a guide line.
      They are also written by engineers who do not do engineering, glorified paper pushers working to justify their existence.

      oops, sorry about that, not bitter, just to many accountants masquerading as engineers...

      Kevin
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