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  • Design classics - pictures thread

    Discussion in 'Industrial design' started by GarethW, Mar 16, 2010.

    1. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Thanks xmechanic, I posted a photo of 1981 Trans Am in our Facebook album.
       
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    3. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      The following is from our Facebook Design Classics album:

      [​IMG]
      Design classic: Coca-Cola contour bottle.
      Apparently this bottle has the waist-to-hip ratio of 0.7, which is considered most attractive in a (wait for it...) woman! This ratio has a strong link to fertility. So this bottle can deservingly be called "sexy".

      [​IMG]

      Design classic: 1915 Coca-Cola contour bottle (first version) original sketch by Earl R. Dean.

      The story behind this bottle is interesting. This is from Wikipedia: The (original) prototype (pictured) never made it to production since its middle diameter was larger than its base, making it unstable on conveyor belts. Dean resolved this issue by decreasing the bottle's middle diameter.
       
    4. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Here's another addition to our "Design Classics" album:

      Design classic: Willys MB US Army Jeep (1941-1945)

      [​IMG]
       
    5. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      And other:

      Design classic: Lounge Chair and Ottoman by Charles Eames (1955)

      [​IMG]
       
    6. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      And other:

      Design classic: Anglepoise lamp


      [​IMG]
       
    7. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

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    8. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

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      I'd say this fag packet is a bit of a classic:
      [​IMG]
       
    9. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Another classic: The Mini

      [​IMG]

      The Mini is a small car that was made by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) and its successors from 1959 until 2000. The original is considered a British icon of the 1960s, and its space-saving front-wheel-drive layout (which allowed 80% of the area of the car's floorpan to be used for passengers and luggage) influenced a generation of car-makers (Source: Wikipedia).

      Cross-section shows how Mini maximizes passenger space:
      [​IMG]

      Compare old and new:
      [​IMG]
       
    10. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Staunton chess set:

      [​IMG]

      The story behind the Staunton chess set (from Wikipedia):

      By the early decades of the 19th century, it was all too clear that there was a great need for a chess set with pieces that were easy to use and universally recognized by chess players of diverse backgrounds. The solution, first released in 1849 by the purveyors of fine games, John Jaques of London, sport and games manufacturers, of Hatton Garden, London England, was to become known as the Staunton chess set after Howard Staunton (1810–1874), the chess player and writer who was generally considered the strongest player in the world from 1843 to 1851. Although Nathaniel Cook has long been credited with the design, it may have been conceived by his brother-in-law and owner of the firm, John Jaques.

      First theory

      The first theory of the development of the set is that Mr. Cook had used prestigious architectural concepts, familiar to an expanding class of educated and prosperous gentry. London architects strongly influenced by the culture of Greece and the culture of ancient Rome were designing prestigious buildings in the neoclassical style. The appearance of the new chessmen was based on this style and the pieces were symbols of "respectable" Victorian society: a distinguished bishop's mitre, a queen's coronet and king's crown, a knight carved as a stallion's head from the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon, and a castle streamlined into clean classical lines, projecting an aura of strength and security. The form of the pawns was based on the Freemasons' Square and Compasses; however, another theory regards the pawns' form as derived from the balconies of Victorian architecture. There were also practical innovations: for the first time a crown emblem was stamped onto a rook and knight of each side, to identify their positioning on to the king's side of the board. The reason for this is that in descriptive chess notation, the rooks and knights were often designated by being the "queen's knight", the "king's rook", etc.

      Second theory

      The second theory is that Jaques, a master turner, had probably been experimenting with a design that would not only be accepted by players but could also be produced at a reasonable cost. In the end, he most likely borrowed and synthesized elements from sets already available to create a new design that used universally recognizable symbols atop conventional stems and bases. Moreover, the pieces were compact, well balanced and weighted to provide a useful understandable playing set.

      Third theory


      The third theory is it was a combination of both theories with the synergy of Mr. Cook the entrepreneur and Mr. Jaques the artisan.[3]
       
    11. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Another design classic: Swiss army knife:

      [​IMG]

      From Wikipedia: It originated in Ibach Schwyz, Switzerland in 1897. The term "Swiss Army knife" is a registered trademark owned by Wenger S.A. and Victorinox A.G., longtime suppliers of knives to the Swiss Armed Forces. Generally speaking, a Swiss Army knife has a blade as well as various tools, such as screwdrivers and can openers. These attachments are stowed inside the handle of the knife through a pivot point mechanism. The handle is usually red, and features a Victorinox or Wenger "cross" logo or for military issue knives the coat of arms of Switzerland.

      The term "Swiss Army knife" was coined by US soldiers after World War II, presumably because they had trouble pronouncing its original name, "Offiziersmesser". Sometimes, the term "Swiss Army knife" is also used metaphorically to describe usefulness, such as a software tool that is a collection of special-purpose tools.

      Origins

      In 1891, Karl Elsener, then owner of a company that made surgical equipment, discovered to his dismay that the Modell 1890 pocket knives supplied to the Swiss army were in fact made in Solingen (Germany). In that age of nationalism, Elsener set out to manufacture the knives in Switzerland itself. At the end of 1891 Elsener took over production of the Modell 1890 knives, but Elsener was not satisfied with its first incarnation. In 1896, after five years of hard work, Elsener managed to put the blades on both sides of the handle using a special spring mechanism, allowing him to use the same spring to hold them in place, an innovation at the time. This allowed Elsener to put twice as many features on the knife; he added a second cutting blade and a corkscrew.
       

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