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  • Design classics - pictures thread

    Discussion in 'Industrial design' started by GarethW, Mar 16, 2010.

    1. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      The "new" Routemaster

      [​IMG]

      From Wikipedia:
      The New Bus for London is a planned 21st Century replacement of the iconic Routemaster as a bus built specifically for use in London. It is to be built by Wrightbus, and will feature the 'hop-on hop-off' rear open platform of the original Routemaster, but will meet the requirements for modern buses to be fully accessible, and will incorporate an electric hybrid driveline. A prototype is expected to be on the road by late 2011, with the first buses due to enter service in early 2012, in time for the 2012 Summer Olympics.

      The design for the new bus features three doors and two staircases to be able to use a rear platform and allow accessible boarding. Unlike the original standard RM Routemaster used in central London, the new bus has a conventional flat front end and a rear platform that can be closed when not needed, rather than the protruding bonneted 'half cab' design and permanently open platform, to allow the bus to be operated by one driver in off peak times.
       
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    3. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      The original (old) Routemaster:

      [​IMG]

      From Wikpedia: The AEC Routemaster is a model of double-decker bus that was built by Associated Equipment Company (AEC) in 1954 (in production from 1958) and produced until 1968. Primarily front-engined, rear open-platform buses, a small number of variants were produced with doors and/or front entrances. Introduced by London Transport in 1956, the Routemaster saw continuous service in London until 2005 and currently remains on two heritage routes in central London.

      The Routemaster was developed by AEC in partnership with London Transport, the customer for nearly all new Routemasters, although small numbers were also delivered to the airline British European Airways (BEA) and the Northern General Transport Company. In all, 2,876 Routemasters were built, with approximately 1,000 still in existence.

      A pioneering design, the Routemaster outlasted several of its replacement types in London, survived the privatisation of the former London Transport bus operators and was used by other operators around the UK. In modern UK public transport bus operation, the unique features of the standard Routemaster were both praised and criticised. The open platform, while exposed to the elements, allowed boarding and alighting away from stops; the presence of a conductor allowed minimal boarding time and optimal security, although the presence of conductors incurred greater labour costs.

      The traditional red Routemaster has become one of the famous features of London, with much tourist paraphernalia continuing to bear Routemaster imagery and with examples still in existence around the world. Despite its fame, the previous London bus classes the Routemaster replaced (the RT-type AEC Regent and Leyland Titan RTL and RTW counterparts) are often mistaken for Routemasters by the public and by the media.
       
    4. Pete

      Pete Well-Known Member

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      Ooh we like a bit of controversy on these boards! :)
       
    5. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

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      I'm not sure about its fat friend.
       
    6. xmechanic

      xmechanic Active Member

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      Bought a lot of those in the course of 29 years, I'm happy to say I was finally able to quit.
       
    7. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      OK, continuing the bus theme :)

      The good old American school bus:


      [​IMG]

      From Wikipedia: In the United States, school buses provide an estimated 10 billion student trips every year. Every school day, over 480,000 school buses transport 26 million children to and from schools and school-related activities; over half of the country's student population is transported by school bus. In the United States, approximately 40% of school districts use contractors to handle student transportation; in Canada, they are used almost universally.

      In 1980, there were six major school bus body manufacturers producing full-size school buses in North America:

      * Blue Bird Body Company
      * Carpenter Body Works
      * Superior Coach Company
      * Thomas Built Buses,Inc.
      * Wayne Corporation
      * Ward Body Works

      The "Big Six" manufacturers produced bodies for chassis from three truck manufacturers (Ford, General Motors, and International Harvester) in addition to two coach-type school bus manufacturers who serviced the West Coast (Crown and Gillig).

      They produced several variations of the bus. Some examples are below.

      An early 1990s Carpenter Classic conventional school bus on a Ford chassis:

      [​IMG]

      Thomas Conventional, Thomas/Freightliner FS-65:

      [​IMG]

      Wayne Lifeguard 71 Bus:

      [​IMG]

      Through the 1980s and 1990s, several manufacturers filed for bankruptcy or were purchased by other manufacturers. One of the few new firms that gained entry into the industry was Freightliner, who became a chassis supplier in the late 1990s. By 2005, only three of the original "Big Six" had survived (Blue Bird, Thomas, and IC Corporation—a rebranding of Ward successor AmTran).

      Here is an recent example - propane powered school bus.

      Blue Bird vision:

      [​IMG]
       
    8. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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      Submarine Spitfire

      Wikipedia: The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft which was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries throughout the Second World War.

      [​IMG]
       
    9. bw2011

      bw2011 Forum Manager

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    10. dakeb

      dakeb Member

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      Lets hope the fat kids don't all sit at the back :D
       
    11. Variant1

      Variant1 Member

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      [​IMG]

      The raised nose Tyrrell 019. Set the precedent for F1 car front end design to this day.
       

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