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  • Design of Magnetic Wheel

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Rutujab, Mar 23, 2013.

    1. Rutujab

      Rutujab Member

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      Hello all,
      If I have to design magnetic wheels for a trolley, what are the factors to be considered?
      What do we actually design in that? :confused:
      If I know wheel diameter, speed of trolley and load on wheels, how to proceed?
      What other inputs are required?
      This is first of such kind of project for me. Kindly help.
       
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    3. jeffreyleung

      jeffreyleung New Member

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      How do you want it to work? By putting current to generate motion?
       
    4. Rutujab

      Rutujab Member

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      trolley will be driven by DC motor. I want magnetic wheels because trolley is going to travel on metallic wall in vertical direction. I don't have any other means to hold trolley on wall. So thought of using magnetic wheels. But then, I am not able to decide/calculate how to select magnetic wheels. What are the deciding parameters? And if magnet is strong, will motor be able to move the trolley? I am totally confused:confused:
       
    5. Michael Ross

      Michael Ross Well-Known Member

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      First - it won't work. Second if it did you could not afford magnets strong enough to do it. Sorry.

      Finally, you can't calculate anything or get good advice without sharing the forces involved and the work that needs to be done, the nature of the loads (solid mounting or capable of shifting), and the trolley - height in particular of the center of gravity of the load, the environment of operation, the cost targets that must be met, the time frame of the design effort, and the ability of your enterprise to survive basic research and development, as opposed to applying existing technology.

      If you begin to answer some of these questions you may get some interesting replies, but I refer you once more to the first sentence.
       
    6. moiz

      moiz Member

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      i would rather use guides and pulleys or a somthing similar to rack and pinion.
       
    7. Bill @ ERG

      Bill @ ERG Member

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      It is always beneficial to approach the problem with a list of requirements, and limitations. State purpose, limitations of the arrangement, capacities and performance, safety requirements, weight and size limitations, expected speed / cycle times, etc. You may find that there are existing arrangements that will work quite well, depending on what you are trying to accomplish. I always use a KISS approach - start with the simplest solutions, and only add complexity as required to solve problems or get closer to the design targets. If simple C-channel tracks with channel rollers and a cable hoisting system will work - this can be assembled from off-the-shelf items meeting certification requirements for safe hoisting. Power can be limited by having two tracks with a cable over a drive drum so the trolleys partially counterbalance.

      There are numerous linear motion track devices available now for materials handling with low operating power requirements, available to suit almost any operating environment. Magnets will have an issue with collecting metallic debris over time, losing strength, or magnetizing the track. If guides are required for directional or location control anyway, the use of magnets is unnecessarily complex and unreliable. Obviously it depends on the application requirements - no man-lift would permit use of magnetic attachment without some physical backup to prevent falling.

      Does the trolley have to change directions from horizontal to vertical? What is being hoisted? What sort of environment? What power constraints are there? Does it always follow the same path? How fast does it travel, and how often does it cycle? Does it have to accelerate rapidly?

      I have found the most critical thing to do when starting design is to define a scope of the design that will permit design decisions to be made. I'd start there and then look into what has been done before in similar applications.
       

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