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  • Does anyone use SpaceClaim?

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by TigerDesign, Mar 19, 2010.

    1. TigerDesign

      TigerDesign Member

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      I have recently downloaded a trial version of SpaceClaim Engineer just to see what it was about. It is an interesting diversion from the typical 3D packages. SpaceClaim uses 'pull handles' in a unique fashion to edit most all features on the fly. The aspect I like the most is that the software can import a variety of formats while retaining the ability to edit individual features cleanly. With most of the packages I have used in the past, imported STEP files end up as dumb solids that are awkward and time-comsuming to change. It's nice to see somebody does it right for a change.

      This system doesn't have the horsepower to compete with SolidWorks, ProE, Inventor, etc...but it may develop a niche market somewhere.

      My questions:
      1) Does anyone else out there use the package?
      2) If you do, what are your thoughts about its advantages/disadvantages/

      Thanks.
       
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    3. emstampa

      emstampa Member

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      I used it everyday, although that may be because our company is also a reseller. I would have to agree with you that it does not have the horse power of some other softwares. We are also a Solid Works reseller, so I have personal experience using both quite a bit. For the majority of projects we used S/W, simply because like you mentioned it's pretty powerful and dynamic..and we have it. We find that with smaller companies who are looking to save some $$ or are not engineers by trade, Spaceclaim is a good fit. The pull feature allows you to modify parts quickly and easily. I've found it much easier to work with if you are an inventor or someone else who has not been exposed to CAD before, but want something with more juice than Google Sketchup. Also another nice feature is the ability to import and export a # of different file formats: ACIS, STEP, IGES, ECAD, Rhinoceros, CGR, DWG, DXF, STL, OBJ, XAML, VRML, and 3D PDF (requires Adobe Acrobat 9 Pro Extended)
       
    4. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      Not to hijack the thread, but I would love to see an open source version of spaceclaim available for linux... ;) BTW I have seen a demo of spaceclaim from one of the software fellas that actually worked for them. I was quite impressed. I never ran it on my own tho...
       
    5. zaki

      zaki Member

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      Hi Guys
      I checked it too. Its good, but as all the market is addicted to use those feature based and sketched features on all other softwares, so It need a lot of time to convert people to this technology. But its awesome.
       
    6. jamjumpin

      jamjumpin Member

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      I did some freelance work for a company that used it and I hated it. I ended up using Inventor and importing it back into space claim afterwards. It took me years to get my company to switch from AutoCAD 3D to Inventor and space claim feels like a step backwards.

      However, most of the main companies are starting to take note of the pace with which spaceclaim is getting adopted and have started including their own direct modelling features, such as Autodesk Inventor fusion. Companies are falling over themselves to provide direct modelling, but it's still going to take a while to convince me.

      If I have 100 holes in a sheet and I decide I actually want 50, or to change the pitch, I can just change some numbers in a pattern. With direct modelling I end up having to select every single hole that I want to work with.
       
    7. bgervais

      bgervais New Member

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      We recently became a major re-seller of SpaceClaim in Canada because we strongly believe direct modeling will become the future of mechanical design. Our team trialed many different direct modelers before we settled on SpaceClaim. I personally was a huge parasolid CAD fan for close to 15 years and I must admit that Pro/E and SDRC I-DEAS were very exciting tools to design with 10 years ago. The problem I found is that parasolid modelers fall short as soon as the feature tree exceeds a 10+ feature count. I remember spending hours debugging a CAD model after I added a change to a model I did not create.
      Direct modelers do not need to track features therefore all you need to worry about is creating geometry. The biggest fear I had was the lack of control compared to parasolid modelers. Once you start using SpaceClaim you'll never want to go back to parasolid modeling (its that fast and easy). I am not trying to say parasolid modeling is not powerful. Just like 2D CAD still has a place, so does parasolid modeling but it is obvious once you start direct modeling that it is the next evolution in mechanical design.
      Many of the direct modeling CAD companies offer a free trial and I would recomend trying out different packages before you decide.

      Ben
       
    8. jamjumpin

      jamjumpin Member

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      For me, direct modelling is a step backwards. We started on direct modelling and switched to history based because it is so much easier to do things accurately and when we want to come back to alter something it is so much quicker.

      In parametric, I change a number and the computer does the rest, in direct modelling I have to bugger about selecting every single hole that I want to move in an array and then sometimes I'll get some kind of error and have to start from scratch.
       
    9. bgervais

      bgervais New Member

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      I agree with jamjumpin regarding a complex pattern; SpaceClaim does fall a little short when it comes to intelligent, complex patterns. However, the SpaceClaim power select tool allows users to select holes and other feature types with a couple clicks.
      I disagree with the comment of step backwards though. Direct Modeling may not satisfy all modeling design scenarios however neither does parasolid modeling nor 2D CAD. I believe direct modeling gives conceptual designers, CAE analysts, subcontractors and tooling designers the additional geometrical power they were lacking with parasolid. The future of design is going to be multi-CAD PLM systems allowing CAD users to use the tools they need, when they need them. With the emerging multi-CAD PLM systems and direct modelers being released, it is an exciting time to be a mechanical designer!
       
    10. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      I find it amusing to hear that "we strongly believe direct modeling will become the future of mechanical design". Direct modeling is nothing new; Cadkey was doing it 20 years ago and now (under the new name KeyCreator) it's still doing it.

      Feature based parametric modeling definitely has its place, but for most design I find it opressively tedious... give me KeyCreator and "no constraints" modeling any day.

      PTC's CoCreate direct modeler also looks interesting, though I've never taken a close look at it.
       
    11. Poorvesh Mistry

      Poorvesh Mistry New Member

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      hi Ben

      hi Ben,

      what is your location in Canada ?
       

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