• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • Draughting advice

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by JME, Oct 12, 2017.

    1. JME

      JME New Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2017
      Posts:
      4
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hi there,


      Just looking for some points of view when it comes to draughting for fabrication drawings. I’ve moved to a company (7 months) and I do only have 4 years or so experience in mechanical design. Since working here I am appalled at the quality of the drawings that are produced, lots of missing information, dimensions and duplicate dimensions (where not needed) etc but essentially just messy looking drawings and I can’t see how the fabrications can be built from them. In the past I have always produced drawings on A3 sized print and in order to get every bit of information I feel is required on them, would never shy away from using as many sheets. Here however, none of the engineers use A3 claiming that the in-house fabricators only like reading off as large a sheet as possible such as A1 and even A0 which for what we build I feel is ridiculous. They don’t like multiple sheets because they always lose them (again, ridiculous). Instead I have been asked to go against what I have learned over the years and squeeze all the information on to one huge sheet. My main problem with that is it is impossible to check properly (which I have to do myself - I'm used to having it checked and approved my 2 other engineers). There’s no way I can sit at my desk with A1/A0 drawings and manage to pick up all the missing info I often need to add. Another frustration is that a lot of the company’s drawings to date dimension heavily through hidden lines, so most views are just a massive clutter and it is difficult to distinguish what components dimensions are showing the position of, which is perhaps why the fabricators need it in such a huge sized print.

      I have got into a few heated discussions when I say that I prefer the method I am used to and am continually told to use their method which I feel I can’t properly do what I am supposed to, which is create clear and concise drawings which can be interpreted well enough to be produced from.

      Any comments appreciated
       
      Last edited: Oct 12, 2017
    2.  
    3. JME

      JME New Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2017
      Posts:
      4
      Likes Received:
      0
      What I'm really asking is, am I right to stick to my morals? Is it more important that I know that I've issued as accurate drawings as I am capable of but may not be exactly presented in a way that the fabricators are used to. (but have always been accepted in my previous companies) They have always complained over the years that there isn't enough information on the drawings so I at least feel me doing it my way will improve things for everyone. Is it as unreasonable as an excuse as I feel to be losing sheets to warrant cramming onto as few sheets as possible?
       
    4. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Sep 2010
      Posts:
      380
      Likes Received:
      3
      Large drawing sheets were necessary back in the day of paper drawings when prints were made by tracing over full size layouts. Nowadays, it seems silly, small sheets are much easier to handle. I very rarely use anything larger than B size, rarely (like once or twice a year) a C size if there's a lot of detail.
       
    5. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

      Joined:
      Nov 2012
      Posts:
      226
      Likes Received:
      0
      I don't know what your company is like, and if 'sticking to your morals' is going to get you in trouble. If your company is set on doing things stupidly, there's probably not a lot you can do.

      If the issue is just losing sheets, you might want to introduce them to this crazy new device called a stapler. Also, make sure you print sheet x of y on the sheet, so they can know when they're missing stuff, and just ask to re-print (or do it themselves).
       
    6. SenthilJPrakash

      SenthilJPrakash Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2017
      Posts:
      11
      Likes Received:
      0
      Sometimes people are very reluctant to change. Rather than trying to change it now, you could approach in a slow/structured manner to introduce a better system gradually. As you have only started recently you could go with the company legacy but slowly start implementing proper procedures such as drawing template (usually couple of different sizes would help), drawing check lists, checking/releasing procedures, standard tolerance groups etc.

      This would also give you the opportunity to talk to suppliers who make the products. End of the day drawings are way of communicating your design to the supplier. So many things we use as drawing standards comes from drawing board days but we still use them because people understand. These days even suppliers are expecting 3D CAD files with the drawing as they can feed it into their CAM.

      So try and be flexible and open minded.

      Hope this helps
       

    Share This Page

    By using this website you agree to our Cookies usage. We and our partners operate globally and use cookies, including for analytics, personalisation, ads and Newsletters