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    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by NoahAva, Mar 26, 2012.

    1. NoahAva

      NoahAva New Member

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      [h=1]Do electrical things draw electricity when they are off but plugged in?[/h]
       
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    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Some do, some don't. For older devices with a simple switch, the answer is no. Many modern devices with electronic controls draw a tiny bit of power so the controls will function when you press a button. In most cases the current draw is miniscule, though. For devices powered by a "wall wart" transformer, there is always current flowing through the transformer when it's plugged in.
       
    4. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

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      A TV on standby is probably the most common example.
       
    5. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Yes... Used to be you had to wait a few minutes for tube type TV's (and radios, for that matter, until) to warm up. Then manufacturers started keeping power to the filaments all the time so they'd start up instantly; unlike modern solid state electronics that used a significant amount of power... until the first energy crisis and people started unplugging their TV when not watching it to save electricity.
       

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