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  • Gusset Mechanical Stiffener Design

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by KevinC, Jun 21, 2014.

    1. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Hi all,

      I'm now in design of some welding parts. I have some questions in designing welding of gussets onto parts to reinforce structures. I'm using tube a lot (as in square or round tube/pipes). Here I'm with a tubular T-joint (square or pipe) subjected to bending/shear/torsion/axial force, I know putting a gusset plate directly onto the center is a not a good design generally. What are something to avoid here, or what is a proper way to reinforce a corner without making it more problematic?

      Any links you guys can point me to?

      Kevin C
       
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    3. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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      I am not sure what you are trying to design this time (you haven't explained) - but maybe you should have a go at designing it with nodes - then you will not need gussets:-

      http://www.chrishendersonphotography.com/index.php#mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=5&p=4&a=0&at=0

      In the lattice booms of cranes - which use tubular section - it tends to be only at the ends of the boom (the pivot points) where "gussets/ flange plates" are used - but they are welded on the outside or close to the outside - and along the centreline of the tube.

      http://www.heavyliftspecialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/LiebherrLR11000.jpg

      You haven't explained the function of your T-joint - but a lot of joints are pinned jointed (i.e. no moment resistance) - you see a lot of that at airports - and in this situation the joining plate (for the pivot point) is inserted into the middle of the tube - or is welded onto the capping plate of the tube - or something along those lines.

      http://www.panoramio.com/photo/12876875
      http://www.lucasuk.com/images/projectphotos/T5_2.jpg

      Hope this helps.
       
    4. Martin1

      Martin1 Member

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      What is the material of the tubes and flange plates?
       
    5. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Thanks, that helps, some good method for joining instead of relying completely on welding.
       
    6. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Flange plates? I'm using gusset to joints to reinforce their strength. Material lets say just stainless steel 304L, or carbon steel 1018.

      I don't have any actual design. Hence materials is not a restrain. What you think, Martin?
       
    7. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      My 2 cents (from building a motorcycle frame) is that you want the gussets to be welded tangentially to the tubes being joined. If joined something other, the tubing can collapse.

      [​IMG]
       
    8. Martin1

      Martin1 Member

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      The items that you are welding, are they structural or are they for artistic projects? There are books by the American Welding Society that explain the welding technics and methods, as well as the material property change in the areas of the weld. Welding 304L stainless steel is different than welding 1018 carbon steel. What type of welding are you using; gas, what gases i.e.,Argon+Oxygen, Argon+CO2+Oxygen etc etc. The material and welding method you select will depend on what you are making, there is no one size fits all. Tig and Mig are other welding methods along with a slew of types of welds i.e., seam, spot, butt, fillet welds. Nothing is easy and simple if you want to do a good job, research the welding technics from the AWS, FCAW and the GMAW.
       
    9. Martin1

      Martin1 Member

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      mvalenti: I can't say right or wrong to your sketch, both have their issues. You only show one side of the weld and not the attachment point on the other side of the gusset; also not explained is the application.
       
    10. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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      Just an off the wall thought - but have you considered using oval or elliptic stainless steel tubing (as opposed to the round tubing I think you had in mind originally) - with the intention of eliminating the "need" for gussets - see link below:-

      http://www.eliptec.co.uk/

      Another option would be to hydro-form the end of the tube - to achieve a bell mouth - to try and "feed the load" from one tube into the other tube. (An expensive option though - because of the tooling).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50H8dzGgb_4

      Hope this helps.
       
    11. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Thank you, mvalenti. This is definitely good explaination. Thanks for drawing a graph to illustrates.
       

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