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  • Gusset Mechanical Stiffener Design

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by KevinC, Jun 21, 2014.

    1. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Hi, Martin. Thanks for the reply. The thing I'm working on is more onto the structural side (not really structural as in building btw). I've read the AWS code on steel and stainless steel, but since it's a design side question, not a fab side question, it doesn't help. But yes, I'm aware I can use FCAW, SMAW, GMAW, TMAW for the work, and I"m aware the the type of weld, and joint types, and even shieding gas.

      Application for me is still quiet open. It is just a general knowledge type of question.
       
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    3. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Thanks, it helps me to get another view to what to use when it's needed. Though I still need to know how to properly apply a gusset, because it's very useful and fast way to get things going. Especially in times when time is pinching.
       
    4. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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      I would not design gusset plates into my design of a tubular frame from the start - because if the part is undergoing cyclic loading - you will most probably get a crack propagating from the weld tip on the end of the gusset.

      So if you really insist on gussets - then I would go down the box section route (which I think was one of your initial thoughts) - and use a "triangular box section gusset".

      Alternatively, I have seen a similar idea used in rally car roll cages - where a tubular frame has been used - and again they are using a "triangular tube section gusset"

      http://cagethis.com/2009/12/porsche-944-complete/

      http://www.modified.com/tech/modp-1110-learning-the-rollover-ropes/photo_04.html

      As with all engineering designs - the "devil is in the detail" of the design.

      Hope this helps.
       
    5. KevinC

      KevinC Well-Known Member

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      Thank you Lochnagar. You've been very helpful!
       

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