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  • Help identifying washing machine motor bearings

    Discussion in 'Help, info & forum announcements' started by sb4, Apr 5, 2016.

    1. sb4

      sb4 New Member

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      1/2 HP washing machine motors seem to have sealed or shielded bearings that are not intended to be serviced. However, I would like to try to replace some anyway.

      Can anyone help identify what bearings are used in a typical 1/2 HP washing machine motor such as this one:

      Kenmore part# 3352287 Washer Drive Motor

      http://www.searspartsdirect.com/par...8PQIUTm985BmUATUi8DxIU31DNWURMsTbMaAi958P8HAQ

      The two opposing bearings do not seem identical. Attached are some photos attempting to show them:

      http://i1261.photobucket.com/albums/ii598/simonbaker4/P1050834_zpsdbcrenaq.jpg
      http://i1261.photobucket.com/albums/ii598/simonbaker4/P1050832_zpsnrekn261.jpg
      http://i1261.photobucket.com/albums/ii598/simonbaker4/P1050835_zpsupjsiukd.jpg
      http://i1261.photobucket.com/albums/ii598/simonbaker4/P1050833_zpsgyghoyrx.jpg

      [h=1][/h]
       
    2.  
    3. Dave Archer

      Dave Archer Active Member

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      These will be standard stock size ball bearings.
      Press them out of the casing and measure them.

      They will be something similar to >

      32 diameter x 15 inside bore diameter x 12 thick.
      32x15x12

      These dimensions are all you really need to know, you don't need to try to find the original manufacturer's versions.
      Look on Ebay for bearings of that same size.

      They will be listed as either ZZ or 2RS.

      ZZ= metal shield, both sides, or 2 rubber seals, one on each side.
      It does not matter which type you choose.


      .
       
      Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
    4. sb4

      sb4 New Member

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      Thanks for the reply, I'll check into those.

      I ended up tearing down the bearings further. It seems these are not actually ball bearings -- I could not find any typical balls-in-a-race kind of design. One bearing seems to be a press-to-fit cylindrical "sleeve" surrounded by an oil reservoir that contained a felt pad with an opening that I am guessing fed oil to the sleeve bearing.

      The other bearing seems to be a sort of "ball" with a hole in it (for the rotor shaft) that was held by another kind of reservoir structure with felt pads. The ball had some ability to swivel in its retainer, which I'm guessing was to accomplish a sort of "self-aligning" bearing to compensate for any slight alignment problems in the overall assembly of the motor.

      I'm attaching some more pictures of the torn down bearings. Only one bearing housing seems to have a distinct "sleeve" into which a conventional ball bearing might be press-fit. These seem like really unusual type bearings. It would be a coup if they could somehow be replaced by conventional ball bearings. The labor that goes into assembling these motors seems to deserve a more serviceable design.


      http://s1261.photobucket.com/user/simonbaker4/media/P1050849resize_zpskmhmqa3s.jpg.html?sort=3&o=4
      http://s1261.photobucket.com/user/simonbaker4/media/P1050853resize_zpszl2dx5w6.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0
      http://s1261.photobucket.com/user/simonbaker4/media/P1050852resize_zpswg1izjs2.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1
       
    5. Bill Toulas

      Bill Toulas Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Bearings and all of their manufacturers comply to specific international standards that designate their dimensions, i.e., width, bore, diameter, etc. Usually, the numbers are engraved on the side, and they are rarely faded due to scrapping or damage, as that doesn't usually happen on the side. If they are, you can still measure the dimensions with a calliper (thickness gauge). Here's a document that describes the designation in detail: https://www.nskeurope.com/downloads/literature_bearing/EN-TI-0111-FINAL.pdf
       
    6. mari

      mari New Member

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