• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • Holy Grail of Mechanical Design?

    Discussion in 'The Leisure Lounge' started by Paul T, Oct 21, 2012.

    1. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Feb 2012
      Posts:
      274
      Likes Received:
      2
      what does it ran for two minutes mean?

      How do you know you started the two different flywheels with exactly the same amount of initial energy?

      Paul, Please do not go any further into debt on this quest. There is only heartbreak at the end of the road.
       
    2.  
    3. Dave Archer

      Dave Archer Active Member

      Joined:
      Jun 2014
      Posts:
      26
      Likes Received:
      0
      .


      I have very little money at the moment as I took a £1500 loan to get the device further because I am so dedicated to proving if the technology is viable.

      I have 100% faith there is something special happening here.
      :)


      There's real dedication to the project !!!!

      Good to see that someone is so convinced with their idea that they are happy to throw real money at it,
      not many people are willing to do that.

      Let's all hope that Paul is at the door of discovering some hidden power source.

      dave


      .
       
    4. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      Erich, seems like you've reneged on what you said.

      Both wheels were rotated backwards 180 degrees from both weights hanging vertically at right angles to the ground plane with one at 12 o'clock and one at 6 o'clock and were let go with no push whatsoever.

      A fair test.

      However despite the way I chose to test the performance, I can physically feel the wheel behaves, whereas you are only hopefully watching the video links I post. There is no physical interaction.

      I have been saying it felt different ever since I fitted those 26kg flywheels. I couldn't put my finger on why until recently.


      The only heartbreak is for the ultra rich folks' bank balances! Not the common man or woman.
       
    5. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      I thought the same thing when I came across the inventor's work. The inventor is in the background somewhere in Moscow building prototypes 12, 13, 14, 15 etc..... searching for the best mechanism to capture gravity and centrifugal force via leverage.

      The energy source is hidden in plain sight, just like a lot of truths!
       
    6. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      When I somehow get the money together to buy a sheet of aluminium. I will get two 800mm x 5mm, 3kg aluminium wheels water jet cut. The run time should increase drastically as the 2 x 26kg flywheels appear to be the load to me.

      It's taken me a while to realise it. Not only do the passive flywheels increase friction, they also are a load.

      Adding a belt and electrical load has the same effect as adding even heavier passive flywheels.
       
    7. K.I.S.S.

      K.I.S.S. Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      May 2014
      Posts:
      181
      Likes Received:
      0
      Paul,
      I'm not going to comment on your idea anymore - I think you know my thoughts.
      All I will do is echo Erich's comments regarding the financial implications for yourself and family, so... If you're going to do this damn silly thing, don't do it in this damn silly way...
      It's obvious that you know very little about mechanical fundamentals (no offence intended), or you would realise that the impetus that a flywheel can obtain is a product of its mass at its periphery (outer diameter) combined with its RPM. That's not fully correct, but it's a good simple principal to start with. Why on Earth would you want to spent a lot of money on water jet profiling a flat sheet of Aluminium?
      Look at some images of flywheels - you'll see that they have the majority of their mass at their outer diameter, where their rotational energy is effectively stored.
      And Aluminium? Really? Flywheels require mass to store energy more effectively. You could achieve the same effect with Cast Iron at probably 1/3rd of the diameter. Go and buy a couple of scrap train wheel rims, weld some spurs and a hub onto them, switch it on and leave the building sharpish - seriously, check for the trueness and balance of something such as this before flicking the switch.
      With that suggestion, I hope I've at least slowed down the entropy of your bank account...
      And there doesn't seem to be any further mention of the upmarket U.K. Company that was very interested?
      You're having a good walk, and you're spoiling it... That's what Mark Twain said about Golf. Take it up (Golf), it's cheaper than the dream of perpetual motion
       
    8. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      You haven't grasped what I am trying to teach you.

      The pendulums are an active flywheel and the passive flywheels are a load. Minimize the load for the optimum active flywheel.

      Before now an active flywheel has not existed?


      I am still working with two companies who are offering their services either for free or at cost.
       
    9. K.I.S.S.

      K.I.S.S. Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      May 2014
      Posts:
      181
      Likes Received:
      0
      All flywheels are active by their nature - their purpose is to store kinetic energy and mete it out in a smooth controllable manner, or to provide bursts of energy that the mechanical or electrical input mechanism is not capable of continuously providing.
      If it's 'passive' then you have a inertia, or friction brake, but not a flywheel.
      Anyway, I was just trying to save you a bit of money, and the principle holds true - there are many cheaper ways of making what you want than spending a lot of money on a couple of water jet profiled slabs of Aluminium - all I was trying to do was make you reach the inevitable conclusion with less expense to yourself.
       
    10. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      Ok that's fine if that's how you and others see the terminology I'm using.

      However, the type of flywheels you are talking about are not the type of flywheels I am experimenting with.

      The type of flywheels you describe do not feature pendulums fitted with one way clutch bearing that use gravity and centrifugal force to add torque to the system and create an unbalanced flywheel that is heavier one side than the other.

      The type of flywheels you describe are pretty much symmetrical, balanced and probably are designed to run at high RPMs.

      The type of flywheels I am describing are asymmetrical, unbalanced and run at low RPMs. This is the part I am calling "active". Therefore, it is my terminology that is wrong.

      Ok my terminology is wrong.

      The inventor has discovered a new type of flywheel.

      The part I am calling "passive" is the solid symmetrical weight that holds the pendulums.

      I'm going to refer to this now as the pendulum support discs.

      The pendulum support discs need to be as light and strong as possible for the asymmetrical, off balance, low RPM flywheel to work more effectively.

      The point of running itself using input from gravity and centrifugal force after an initial back turn of 90 degrees requires maximum off balance for the correct acceleration amount. If the device is not off balance to the point it will accelerate to a speed to swing the pendulums out enough to maintain the off balance and acceleration it will stop eventually.

      Once the correct acceleration is reached the device will self sustain.

      The solid symmetrical discs are hindering the off balance so the acceleration is not substantial enough to lock the device into the domino effect.

      The domino effect is shown in the inventers video called "inertia deflects".

      https://www.dropbox.com/s/6l1cojripb9pmrm/Inertia deflects.mp4?dl=0



      This simulation backs up what I am saying about the best way to utilize an unbalanced flywheel.



      The ball in this video is equivalent to the pendulums. The balanced bar is the equivalent of the pendulum support discs.

      I have gone in completely the wrong direction with the pendulum support discs mass.


      If the simulation was made the opposite way around with the ball being heavy and the balance bar being light, the block of ice would still move far but the angular velocity would have increased greatly.

      Anyone else get it yet?
       
      Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2016
    11. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 2012
      Posts:
      392
      Likes Received:
      0
      When the angular velocity of the device reaches the amount to make the device self sustain. You will believe me!

      I'm not far away so I'm just going to keep putting money in until I get there. I'm really not far away now.

      Of course adding more pendulums is going to help massively. I did want to prove this with two ideally.
       

    Share This Page

    1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
      Dismiss Notice