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  • Holy Grail of Mechanical Design?

    Discussion in 'The Leisure Lounge' started by Paul T, Oct 21, 2012.

    1. Mark_Armstrong

      Mark_Armstrong Active Member

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      It is a nice hobby project.

      What do you predict will happen when you plumb pressurized air to the inlet?
       
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    3. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

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      There is one diverging nozzle with 1/2" air tap. There is also a port which will be used to start the turbine. Either by compressed air or by vacuum.

      Once the turbine is at idle speed the compressed air or vacuum will be removed.

      A vacuum/pressure gauge will then be fitted to the port.

      The vacuum will cause a chain reaction due to the high pressure moving to lower pressure.

      The heat of the imploding water vapour will be transferred into kinetic energy, thus increasing the speed and vacuum of the turbine.

      Once the radial pressure reaches a certain limit it will prohibit the speed increase of the turbine.

      The turbine will produce thrust but the axle will have no appreciable side thrust because it has a double flow rotor with a solid centre disc. 13 x 0.8mm discs in total and two tapered 4mm end plates.

      The discs have 0.5mm clearance top and bottom. The end plates have a 0.1mm clearance top and bottom and 1mm on the sides.
       
      Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
    4. Mark_Armstrong

      Mark_Armstrong Active Member

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      What if, from the moment you remove the energy supply (the pressure or the vacuum), the turbine slows down and eventually stops? What would you conclude from that?
       
    5. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

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      That I should give up making prototypes and hide with embarrassment.
       
    6. Mark_Armstrong

      Mark_Armstrong Active Member

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      There's nothing wrong with model making as a hobby.

      Just be realistic about what you are doing.
       
    7. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

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      The first ever commercially successful engine was called the "Atmospheric Engine".

      This is just a much better way.

      In an explosion, matter and energy fly outward, but in an implosion, matter and energy collapse inward. ... So in short, implosions are caused by having a greater pressure on the outside of an object than on the inside."

       
    8. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

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      At 156,000rpm a 1500 gram rotor with a diameter of 127mm has 403643 Disk KE (joules) and is moving at 1037 Surface Speed (M/sec)

      I'd say that is much more than a model Mark!
       
    9. Mark_Armstrong

      Mark_Armstrong Active Member

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      Well, good luck with that.

      I look forward to the next thing you decide to dabble with.
       
    10. Paul T

      Paul T Well-Known Member

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      The next thing will be the stage 2 machine propelled by the air of the stage 1 turbine.

      I look forward to finally getting you lot to eat humble pie..... At last!!!
       
    11. Mark_Armstrong

      Mark_Armstrong Active Member

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      We shall see. I am still not entirely clear on what you really think will happen.

      Start with low pressures (5 psi) and work up. Rotor unbalance will catch up with you as the RPM increases.
       

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