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  • Hot Point VTD00 dryer

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Auto Engineer, Nov 20, 2014.

    1. Auto Engineer

      Auto Engineer Active Member

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      Not sure if this is the right part of the forum to put this, but here goes.

      The dryer incorporates a drum where the drum is located by a plain bearing through a brass rectangular bush into the back supporting wall. The drum has a rubber belt around the circumference and is pulled taught at the bottom over the motor drive spindle, which is a serpentine belt design with about five grooves in it. The front face cover of the dryer, which houses the door has four plastic type plain bearings fitted into it that guide the drum when in motion.

      The problem.

      When damp washing is placed into the drum and running the drum rubs hard against these four plastic type bearings and has now overheated the belt and burned it to the point that it has broken.

      Without washing in the drum and now while the belt is broken, the drum can be easily turned but with very little effort the drum actually rubs against these front plastic bearings and I can now understand that when the belt is fitted under tension, the drum is pulled against these plastic bearings and the drum cannot turn freely.

      A previous repair I did was to weld a piece of rectangular metal block onto the rear supporting wall for the plain bearing, which has worked for quite a long time, but the drum is now rubbing excessively again against these plastic bearings, causing excessive friction.

      I can see that the design of this bearing and support assembly is very cheap and unreliable and would like to make it more substantial so that the drum when loaded will support the weight and the force acting from the belt.

      I thought about a support wheel/bearing type arrangement underneath the drum to help support the drum while turning, but I don't know how to explain what I want to ask any domestics engineers what I need?

      The last domestic engineer I spoke to advised me to cut/shave down the plastic bearings in the front face cover, which can't be right because the manufacturer would not have made then to the specifications they are if they were too thick.

      Any opinions welcome.
       
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    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      What you describe (the plastic bushings in the front) is a pretty typical setup. Some dryers do have the drum supported by rollers below it. Usually the plastic bushings last for the life of the dryer (typically about 10 years). Are the bushings wearing from axial or radial loads? If axial, likely the rear bearing has worn and is allowing too much axial motion. Either way, replace the plastic bushings (and the rear bearing if necessary) and you should be good for a good while longer. One other possible issue is corrosion of the drum from the moisture causing the plastic bushings to wear prematurely; if that's the case it might be time for a new dryer.

      Industrial suppliers sell a variety of small wheels or rollers with bearings, sold as caster wheels or conveyor skate wheels. Locally available skateboard wheels or snowmobile track rollers might work. I know where I'd look in the US but I don't know about UK suppliers. But if it's axial wear then support rollers won't help.
       
    4. Auto Engineer

      Auto Engineer Active Member

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      Thanks Dana, I am going to be looking at this dryer at the weekend now my new belt has arrived. I have only just thought about this idea, now the bearing that supports the drum is not that strong in the material design, and the back wall support is the same, so today I thought about welding a stainless steel plate to the back wall and making a new bearing out of stainless steel, if welding the stainless steel plate to the cheaper type tin plate they use is going to be a problem, then so long as the plate has sufficient area I should be able to rivet the plate in place and assemble the dryer?

      I'll have to give it a go and see?

      Thanks
       

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