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  • How do tungsten and tungsten carbide differ?

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by cynthiamyra, Jun 22, 2016.

    1. cynthiamyra

      cynthiamyra New Member

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      Can anyone answer this question?
       
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    3. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member

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    4. Credence

      Credence New Member

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      Tungsten is a metallic element. It is fairly brittle with a very high melting point. It is referred to as a refractory metal, because it can take extremely high temperature, especially when in an atmosphere such as H2. Tugsten Carbide is Tungsten-Carbon compound that is generally in powder form. Large parts are made out of Tungsten Carbide by adding an additional powdered element such as cobalt. The mixture is generally pressed into a secific shape forming a machinable "pre-form". The pre-form is then fired where the mixture is sintered creating an extremely hard substance in the Rc 70 range. Tungsten Carbide is used in many applications such as cutting tool inserts, bearing races, or where extreme wear resistance is needed. Tungsten is used in HTCC sustrates as a conductive ink and via fill paste, which when fired, becomes the inner circuitry for high end military and medical ceramic circuit boards. Tungsten is also used as the non-consumable electrode in TIG welding and Plasma Cutting. When TIG welding Aluminum, the Tungsten is used in its pure state where its volume redistivity is at its highest, allowing the welder to create a spherical end on the tip of the electrode. This provides a larger electrode surface so the general area of the part being welded can be heated well enough to weld properly. When welding steel or iron-based metals the Tungsten is doped with a conductivity increasing element, usually Thorium. The electrode is ground to a sharp point so the arc can be controlled to a very specific area on the part being welded without the electrode melting.
       
    5. QuickSpecter

      QuickSpecter New Member

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      Hello, there are some very good tutorials on https://www.youtube.com/ that can really help you, unfortunately i don't remember the exact links right now :( .
       

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