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  • How to calculate power of wind turbine?

    Discussion in 'Calculations' started by afosnobueno, Nov 26, 2012.

    1. afosnobueno

      afosnobueno New Member

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      I need help How to calculate power of wind turbine?

      Thanks
       
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    3. Sigismund

      Sigismund New Member

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    4. tonycro

      tonycro Well-Known Member

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    5. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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    6. Michael Ross

      Michael Ross Well-Known Member

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      Be careful about calculating this.

      I have some questions. I list them and then tell you why I ask.

      What do you want to do with the calculated result?

      What decisions will be made based on the calculation?

      How much do you care if your are incorrect?

      If you look around on the internet for new wind turbine designs, you will often, when looking at smaller ones, find a lot of pretty pictures (untried prototypes and CAD renderings), and claims of some power output that is calculated - not based on actual testing. They haven't finished the design, and they are seeking financial support to get a prototype built, or to fund sales effort.

      Mostly, these calculated output curves are junk. There is testing that needs doing, and then you may have a power curve of some merit. May have, if it is done well.

      I would suggest comparing a design to similar existing turbines and guessing as a better way to determine a power curve than to do a theoretical calculation. Compare, looking for the differences in the designs and estimate honestly how that will change the results. Don't leave out any of the constituent systems: blades, rotating machinery including the transmission, the generator, the inverter, the electrical gear, the foundation, and the support structure. Any one of these can throw the cost off enough to ruin payback. It isn't all about the efficiency of the turbine itself whether or not you can make money off of it. If the support structure is over-designed you may pay for extra years on it, and if it is insufficient, then you will have catastrophic failures before testing and certification are completed. Hopefully, no one gets hurt.

      If there are no similar existing turbines, then expect trouble. A lot of good work has been done and you can see the results up on pylons turning. If it doesn't look like them, then be wary. Particularly, be wary of vertical axis turbines. There is a great material inefficiency in the design of vertical turbines that is avoided completely with horizontal axis designs.

      If you are an engineer, take note that theory is difficult to translate into useful calculations for wind turbines. If you are an investor, be aware that a lot of very smart, honest people have believed calculations and been disappointed when the actual hardware was built. Both should beware that when testing a prototype, that really good set up and instrumentation are needed, or the noise in the data acquisition, and thus the results may trick you into giving up or pursuing a design incorrectly.

      You should hesitate before spending much money before realistic, real world testing has been done.

      By now you should understand that this is not trivial calculation. I doubt if you can get a substantial answer from an internet forum.
       

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