• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • How to find the required material thickness against Impact Load

    Discussion in 'Members only subforum' started by Nagaraju, Sep 28, 2016.

    1. Nagaraju

      Nagaraju New Member

      Joined:
      Sep 2016
      Posts:
      3
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hello
      I am Nagaraju,working as mechanical design engineer. In one of my project i need to find the load induced on the component while dropping the object from 1 m height on the rigid ground floor.
      Component details are here:
      Material : Sheet Metal
      Length: 300 mm
      Width : 175 mm
      Height : 10 mm
      Drop Height: 1 m
      Can anyone help me to find out the max load acting on the component (after impact) and also how can i find the material thickness required to withstand that load.
      Please let me know if any additional information required.
      But i found the Max load value through the formula:a^2 = (kv1^2)/(2m)
      where k = stiffness of the material
      v = velocity after impact
      m = mass of the object.
      a = acceleration after impact.
      so Force induced can be F = mxgxa N.

      Note: I found the stiffness of the materiel through simulation. (Apply 100N force and obtain the deflection value 0.1578 mm so K can be load / deflection).
      Pls also check whether this approach is correct.
      I
       
      Last edited: Sep 28, 2016
    2.  
    3. Ganesh Moorthi

      Ganesh Moorthi Member

      Joined:
      Nov 2016
      Posts:
      13
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hi Nagaraju,

      Kinetic energy = Impact force x distance travelled after impact.

      Kinetic energy = 1/2 * m * v^2

      Velocity = (2*g*h)^0.5

      You need to know distance travelled after impact, The properties of impact surface(Restitution coefficient) decides this distance and the impact time.

      So, Impact force can be calculated as Kinetic energy / distance travelled after impact.

      Hope this helps... My advice is to perform this calculation using impact simulation.
       

    Share This Page

    By using this website you agree to our Cookies usage. We and our partners operate globally and use cookies, including for analytics, personalisation, ads and Newsletters