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  • How to gain common sense?

    Discussion in 'The Leisure Lounge' started by Wmech, Apr 27, 2013.

    1. Douglas J. Carr

      Douglas J. Carr New Member

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      Doug

      I think you are already displaying "Good sense" by the fact that you are trying to find this common sense. Nobody knows it all. Pay attention to your surroundings and people around you. Learn from the lessons. Knowing how to make things, does indeed make it eaiser to design. Learn the manufacturing processes. You sound young, life will give you plenty of lessons in common sense. Just remember them, you'll do fine.
       
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    3. Wmech

      Wmech Member

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      Hi CarlK,

      Thank you for such detail explanation on this topic. I really appreciate the input of how i view the 'common sense' and I do understand the practical application to gain more 'common sense'.

      i wouldn't agree with you more and that was one of my intention as well. I have recently graduated from college and somehow there is something missing in terms of hand-on skills. It is quite essential in this field as well because everything gets built by theory in the practical way that makes sense.

      This is why I keep insisting myself to do more work at the shop instead of sitting in front of the computer. This "tank" is one of a good example for me to learn from the 'common sense' by building stuffs myself. It is true that there are some bias from different perspectives. However, i do appreciate the input from my co-worker as well. Like you said, the more things i touch, the more i will know about common sense.

      once again, thank you for your input
       
    4. Wmech

      Wmech Member

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      Hi Doug,

      Thanks for the support and the input. I will try my best to remember them all in this field.
       
    5. Strambo

      Strambo Member

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      I think you will do fine in your job with more experience and self confidence.
      One thing that we should consider is "Why?". Why put the insulator on before the leak test? Why leak test first?

      If leak test failure must be examined, then the insulation must be removed. If the tank passes leak test, it just goes down the line.
      1. Do you save time in overall assembly by adding insulation before leak test?
      2. Are there a large number of leak failures that require repair? Enough to eat up all the time you saved?

      I would suggest a time study to compute the tradeoff based on time standard for each operation and the throughput (first time) yield at leak test. The justification for a process change is best started with some kind of analysis like that. It can show you "the numbers" that will tell if one way is better than the other.

      Best Regards
       
    6. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      With the tank leak test, it's not "common sense" at all that you're talking about, it's engineering experience. As a new engineer you wouldn't be expected to have the experience to instantly recognize, for example, a potential problem in a design or procedure.

      It's common sense to know that you shouldn't ride a bicycle across a highway. Common sense might even lead you to realize that a traffic control system is needed to allow bicycles to cross the highway. Engineering experience, however, is needed to design the most appropriate system, and to understand and plan for the effects of failure of that control system.
       

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