• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • Hydraulic cylinder(Shell) stresses

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Johnatan88, May 18, 2015.

    1. Johnatan88

      Johnatan88 New Member

      Joined:
      May 2015
      Posts:
      1
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hello guys,
      this is my first time here take an apology if I choose wrong section of forum.
      I just want to know should in shell of double-acting hydraulic cylinder (as in hydraulic presses ) should longitudinal/axis stress be analyzed beside radial and Circumferential/hoop stress and take in consideration.
      I searched everywhere and couldn't find answer. I know that longitudinal stress is not important for open end cylinder such as gun barrel, but what about hydraulic press cylinder??

      Thanks in advance
       
    2.  
    3. CPPMable

      CPPMable Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Nov 2012
      Posts:
      100
      Likes Received:
      0
      You could consider this as a pressure vessel if that is easier to understand since all sides are closed compared to a gun barrel which has an end open to ambient pressure. Which alleviates the longitudinal stresses in the barrel.
       
    4. Serafij

      Serafij New Member

      Joined:
      Jul 2015
      Posts:
      1
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hallo Johnatan88

      As CPPMable stated the thinking of a pressure vessel does erase the necessity to look at the pressure direction.
      What you need to look at the minimal material thickness (at max. pressure).
      Secondly the link between the mantel and the end-cap along with the seals must withstand the same pressure.

      Important: dont forget the safety factor! (Hydraulic systems can get extremly dangerous quite fast)

      Be aware that such calculations only describe static systems. If there are strong dynamic factors such as high frequency or high pressure-spikes a deeper consideration is necessary.

      Usually you need to calculate the longitudinal/axis pressure to determine the Force of the cylinder (The axial pressure on the surface of the end cap equate normally to the pressure on the plunger surface of the push-side).

      Presumable is the combination off "a cylinder is normally viewed at as a pressure vessel" and "this force is usually calculated elsewhere" should be the reason why you had found nothing in this direction.

      Does this answer your question (if still open) or is still something unclear?


      Greetings
       

    Share This Page