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  • Hydraulics Question

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Cragyon, Sep 4, 2013.

    1. Cragyon

      Cragyon New Member

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      Does anybody know the compressibility constant of water and air?
       
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    3. nich

      nich Active Member

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      I think water is incompressible
       
    4. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Nothing is truly incompressible, although many liquids can be treated as such as a simplifying assumption in most cases.
       
    5. PierArg

      PierArg Well-Known Member

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      I agree with Dana.
      For your calculation you can consider the water as incompressible.
       
    6. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      It depends on what he's trying to calculate, and what kinds of pressures are involved. For example, in subsonic aerodynamics, even air is generally treated as incompressible, though obviously it's not.

      As far as the actual values the OP is looking for, I don't know off the top of my head, but google is your friend.
       
    7. PWASS

      PWASS Well-Known Member

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      Almost everything can be compressed, even things that are said to be 'uncompressible', for example mineral hydraulic oil on average compresses by 0.5% for every 1,000psi or 0.007%/Bar.

      Water compresses by 0.004%/Bar and air by a staggering 100%/Bar, that's why an air receiver holds so much air.

      An air receiver charged to 8 Bar holds 8 times the volume of the receiver.
       

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