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  • Idea to improve chain design

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by kaarvannan, Mar 26, 2012.

    1. kaarvannan

      kaarvannan Member

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      Hello all,
      I am trying to design a chain that should hold a mass against a cylindrical pipe(vertical). Each link has a wheel, thus the mass can be made to go around the pipe by manual force. My problem is that, each time the mass goes around the pipe and back to its initial position, its vertical position on the pipe has come down a little. I need to prevent this from happening. I am able to tighten the chain to reduce this problem a little, however I am not able to eliminate it.
      The only way I can think to make this better is to tighten the tolerance between one link to the next.
      Is there any thing I can do to make this chain better?
       
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    3. Douglas J. Carr

      Douglas J. Carr New Member

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      If you put a twist in the chain once, will it force it to go up rather than slip down? As it comes off the gear it should try to straighten itself moveing in the upward direction. Just a thought.
       
    4. dons3d

      dons3d New Member

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      make it ride in a track?
       
    5. adamru

      adamru Member

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      Unfortunately friction alone will never keep your chain in the same height for long. it is the result of several factors, including tolerances and clearances in your system. My best advise to you is to place a collar around the pipe at the right position and let the chain press on this collar. It may be made of several parts for easy assembly and kept in position by tension much like you do with your chain. There are several ways you could make this collar to support the chain in a fixed position, and I am sure you shall find your way easily. The important thing to understand is that while the rotating chain will never stay in position, the stationary collar will.
       
    6. Dan Pohly

      Dan Pohly Member

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      The wheels in your chain have a side load, and all wheels with a side load tend to slip in the direction of the load as they roll. This sideways slip, in relation to the forward motion, creates what's called a slip angle. For example the tires of your car have a slip angle anytime there is a side load on them such as when you drive around a corner. In theory, if you mount the wheels on your chain at an upward angle that exactly matched the slip angle, the mass would not drop as it rotates. However, in practical terms this will never work perfectly because the slip angle will be impossible to precisely match and it will probably also vary due to environmental conditions. Plus if you need to also rotate in the opposite direction it will make matters much worse. So I agree with others that a track or other mechanical retention of some sort will be necessary.
       
    7. kaarvannan

      kaarvannan Member

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