• Welcome to engineeringclicks.com
  • invisible jet

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Seaton, May 2, 2013.

    1. Seaton

      Seaton New Member

      Joined:
      Mar 2012
      Posts:
      2
      Likes Received:
      0
      Hi I am trying to design an invisible jet but what I want to do is try and utilise a chemical substance which would be able to react to its surroundings blending in making it "invisible". Any theories I need to look at that is out there?
       
    2.  
    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Sep 2010
      Posts:
      342
      Likes Received:
      3
      I think you need the magic forum, not the mechanical design forum.
       
    4. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

      Joined:
      Jul 2009
      Posts:
      1,424
      Likes Received:
      5
      :D

      and I need a bit of help with my time machine...
       
    5. Starlet

      Starlet Member

      Joined:
      Apr 2012
      Posts:
      11
      Likes Received:
      0
      :eek:
      You know my time machine?
       
    6. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Sep 2010
      Posts:
      342
      Likes Received:
      3
      Yes, I'm going to borrow it last week :)
       
    7. OB.YEMOH

      OB.YEMOH New Member

      Joined:
      Dec 2012
      Posts:
      3
      Likes Received:
      0
      I suggest u go with light instead of chemicals ...something that could combine light and a mirror surface to appear as if not there
       
    8. Michael Ross

      Michael Ross Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Mar 2012
      Posts:
      52
      Likes Received:
      1
      I have the answer, but I am waiting for the patent to go through, then I will license it to you for a GD fortune.
       
    9. Lemuel

      Lemuel New Member

      Joined:
      May 2013
      Posts:
      2
      Likes Received:
      0
      I'm sure there are a few SF/F theories on how to make things invisible, but I don't think there are any practical, "real-world" theories you could apply to the problem.

      There are, of course, ways to make a stationary object seem to disappear for an observer in a specific position relative to the object, but it is exponentially more difficult to prevent a stationary object being seen from all possible vantage points. When you add the complexity of a moving object to the equation there are just too many variables to solve.

      Sorry, but there's no Golem/Bilbo magic ring or "Ring of Gyges" (the original ring of invisibility), no 007 Aston Martin "Vanish", and no "Predator" chameleon camouflage suit. These things might make for good cinema, but they aren't at all realistic.

      I think the only "invisibility" scene from a movie that comes remotely close to being possible is in "MI4: Ghost Protocol" when they are moving down the hallway of the Kremlin with a projector screen that uses head tracking and forced perspective to fool the guard. The nice thing about this scene is that it does an excellent job of demonstrating the difficulties in making things disappear.
       
    10. Karl Jeffers

      Karl Jeffers New Member

      Joined:
      May 2013
      Posts:
      2
      Likes Received:
      0
      My friends, your sarcasm, if I may call it such, does not befit you.
      Visionaries and innovators always have been perceived as strange and quaky, and for the right reasons - they always came up with strange ideas, ideas that defied the commonly held beliefs in that day and age. Did all people believe that Copernicus was right about the earth revolving around the sun? Did all people believe that the Right brothers will be able to make a working airplane? NO, they didn't, they've called the crazy, they've said it would be impossible, they were cynical and sarcastic.

      But you are not empty headed morons, you are smart people, technical people, engineers and inventors, not some bone headed idiots that immediately dismiss everything that seems new and strange. You are better than that.

      But on the other hand, it's really hard to blame you, people much greater than you made similar mistakes. An example jumps to mind of the former founder of IBM stating that there would not be a market for more than five computers in the world, and he wasn't stupid, well, maybe a bit boneheaded.
       
    11. Michael Ross

      Michael Ross Well-Known Member

      Joined:
      Mar 2012
      Posts:
      52
      Likes Received:
      1
      The Wright brothers worked with existing physical principles. Currently there is no known physical principle that supports invisibility, any more than the laws of thermodynamics can be violated and perpetual motion is possible. A belief in the possibility of invisibility, is pretty much a sign of not understanding one's education, or delusion.

      I try try to restrain my own urges to be an idea skeet shooter, but some ideas deserve no brain power at all.

      Now maybe the idea of making things invisible can go away. Perhaps it would be easier to make a gobsmack ray gun that confounds people so they can't see things. We already have flash bombs.
       

    Share This Page