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  • link and pin design

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Murali C, Apr 15, 2013.

    1. Murali C

      Murali C New Member

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      Hi folks, I need to design (for academic purpose) a pin which is under pure shear (only lateral load) and a link to transmit 10000 Nm torque. Please check the attachment for details Could any one help me on how to design the pin, do i have to use any failure theories (like Maximum shear stress theory or distortion energy theory etc.)??

      Link attached for details.


      Thanks,
      Murali
      https://www.rapidshare.com/#myrs_filemanager/file/999
       
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    3. Benoit Jolin

      Benoit Jolin New Member

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      Interesting Project

      I can't look at your attachment. Your projects sounds interesting though. Dealing with shear stress and the shear strength factor is interesting. You also have to consider if the pin is meant to be a sacrificial device or if you desire a strong connection. I'm a little confused about your question about failure theories. If you don't have a failure theory, how can you obtain a safety factor. When I analyse pins, I use the shear stress theory unless I have combined loading. Either way, bending stress is usually the failure modes in pins.
       
    4. ifeoluwa

      ifeoluwa New Member

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      no failure theory,no F.O.S,really?
       
    5. Benoit Jolin

      Benoit Jolin New Member

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      Are you presenting an argument?
       
    6. joninstjohn

      joninstjohn Member

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      I agree Benoit, as with many questions posted here the acceptance criteria aren't stated. Is the pin really in pure shear or is that an assumption? Normally things like this are based on design codes unless it is a shear pin that is designed to break at a certain load in which case failure theory is required but in the real world that only gets you into (a sometimes very big) ball park.

      I can't see the attachment but generally in engineering terms a pin doesn't have rotational stiffness so I'm not clear how the torque is applied to the link. More detail is required for me to help I'm afraid.
       

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