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  • Living Bridge of India

    Discussion in 'The Leisure Lounge' started by Pete, Dec 9, 2009.

    1. Pete

      Pete Well-Known Member

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      Found this web page posted on LinkedIn, and quite frankly, you can keep your robotics - I think it’s amazing!

      [​IMG]

      This is a bridge which is 'grown' by directing the roots of a particular type of tree. Once the roots reach the other side of the gap, they are allowed to take root again in the earth. Over time, the bridges become stronger.

      Here's the original link http://forum.xcitefun.net/cherrapunji-wettest-place-on-earth-living-bridge-of-india-t35867.html

      Apparently it takes 10-15 years to 'build' but I'm curious - do you think this idea can be adapted for use in towns and cities. Imagine if a city infrastructure could be grown, not built!
       
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    3. shlamimo

      shlamimo Active Member

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      Hey Pete! Excellent idea for India and other tropical jungly places ... but I think it's not going to pass the Health and Safety inspection in the UK :D I do agree that nature is by far the most amazing engineer/designer and we should look into more ways to employ it.

      There are some attempts to incorporate nature into architecture, for instance in London, Islington council is trying to introduce green/brown roofs and walls on some of the buildings. One of the more famous "projects" is the the "living wall" that to my knowledge is dead. Apparently the problem was with the watering system, but I think it didn't work because those plants just didn't want to grow horizontally :mrgreen: Here's the pic:

      [​IMG]

      They did succede with the roofs (this proves just how much easier it is to grow plants vertically!). Here's more info: http://www.islingtongardeners.org.uk/new/roofs.php
       
    4. shlamimo

      shlamimo Active Member

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      Just to add to the previous post - Patrick Blanc, is the guru of vertical gardens. His website: http://www.verticalgardenpatrickblanc.com/

      One of his creations* (Pont Max Juvénal, Aix-en-Provence):

      [​IMG]

      Here's his interview:


      And here's another intersting green project* - the Academy of Sciences roof in California.

      [​IMG]

      *Photos are from nytimes.com
       
      Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2016
    5. Pete

      Pete Well-Known Member

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      I think 'Green Roofs' are becoming more and more common, and have certainly been around for a long time - they offer very good insulation for houses and green spaces for employees in built up areas - particularly like this building courtesy of good old Wikipedia!

      [​IMG]

      I say screw health and safety, London needs more creaky tree root bridges!
       
    6. matt_decat

      matt_decat Member

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    7. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      If London Bridge were a creaky tree, how would the lyrics have gone?
       
    8. Pete

      Pete Well-Known Member

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      Fire retardation... Didn't think of that... Rats!
       
    9. MSHOfficial

      MSHOfficial Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Nature gives us engineers hints and we are supposed to take them and build better things. For example, the bridge in India is only possible in tropical places we all know that. But we should learn how the tree bridges grow stronger in time and how they root each other to act as a very strong bridge. Then apply them to places where we cannot have trees as such to build these bridges. That’s engineering.

      Also this post needs to be seen, its interesting, so I am bringing it back to life.
       
    10. tmark938

      tmark938 Moderator EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Time and time again the pointers return back to nature - I think we have so so much more we can learn from nature. When you think about it, these structures such as the tree represent millions of years of evolution. The fact the bridge gets stronger and stronger - the opposite to human designs, where the design is at its strongest on day one after completion - is fascinating.
       

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