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  • Motor cycle designing(HELP)

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by antimatter, Aug 13, 2011.

    1. antimatter

      antimatter New Member

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      Hey guys, i mean all mechanical engineers
      I m a graduate in mechanical engg. and i wanted to know how can i entry in motor cycle designing...
      I want to become a motor cycle or cruiser bike designer and i intend to start my own shop for the same..
      Any suggestions??
       
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    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Unless you can get an entry level job at a bike manufacturer, your best bet is to build your own bike, as a hobby project... bring it to a bike show or a cruise night... then sell it and build another. Repeat as necessary; if it's good enough word will get around and you're in business.

      Recreational machinery (bikes, boats, planes, whatever) is a tough business to be in because there are so many hobbyists looking to make their hobby into a business. Most who try it go broke. Don't quit your day job too soon.
       
    4. Harshad

      Harshad Member

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      Get better control on theory described in following subjects.

      1) Strength of Material
      2) Theory of Machine
      3) Dynamics of Machine
      4) Machine Design.

      Do all the calculations required for all the parts and assemblies in bike your own. Just show that to any Bike manufacturer, You will be at TOP. Even after this calculations, you search criteria will be refined and people will start come to you.
       
    5. The Model Citizen

      The Model Citizen New Member

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      It depends where in the industry you want to be. You mention that your want to design bikes but then say you want your own shop. To me that suggests that you want to be a "builder" rather than a designer.

      I say that because working as a bike designer is really just like working on any other engineering/design project. Sitting in offices and doing the calculations etc. Building is a more hands on, custom and, if I may say so, romantic concept of making bikes.

      If building is what you want to do, then, as already suggested, get to it. Publicize it, sell it, repeat.

      If designing is what you really want to do then it is a much harder road to walk. Lots of people want to get in and there are never that many positions. Approach the large manufacturers and get in doing CAD work. This way you are in the company and you have the chance to learn lots and prove yourself. There is no way known that someone can get into a company and start designing bikes/cars. Chief designers have years of experience behind them, not just in styling but in engineering, manufacturing, marketing, economics etc

      If you're in the States you could try Polaris as they are on a push at the moment as they have just bought into Brammo and and developing electric vehicles. Or, Triumph in the UK are always looking for design engineers for their chassis or power train teams. Constantly scanning the job boards for contracts is the way to go. Be prepared to prove that you have knowledge in the right areas beyond just being into bikes. They don't tolerate time wasters. Also, quite often you'll only get one chance at a company so you want to make the right impression. Get up to date on the latest technologies employed in bikes, manufacturing techniques, engine technologies, chassis basics etc. All subjects you could be quizzed about in an interview. Sadly, you need to make some sacrifices as well. These companies won't be on your doorstep and, as I said before, lots of people want in so you have to prove to them you want to be there. Generally you won't get help relocating or travelling etc

      Another avenue is, and this is from a UK perspective, research and approach the bike design consultancies that the big factories outsource to. A bit harder to find but in the UK there are quite a few. This may be another way to get in but the comments on knowledge still stand. Maybe even more so as these companies do not have the time or money to train.

      A well thought out and presented portfolio helps in a big way as well. If you're interested PM me and I can direct you to my online one.

      I know that I am making sound very difficult and in a way it is. But, perserverance is one thing that does help. I've been doing bike design since the mid 90's. I've been an employee, contractor and self employed. I've even moved countries (Oz to UK) to help increase my chances. Has it been hard? Yes! Has it fun? Hell yeah! Has it paid off? Certainly, as next week I start my fulltime position as a design engineer at one of the major brands.

      Good luck
       
      Last edited: Nov 5, 2011
    6. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      What he said....
      What I'm doing...Before and after (well for now)....
      [​IMG]
       
    7. cadtools

      cadtools Member

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      Is that a GS 850G? Sweet.. What functionality was improved by the modifications?

      scott
       
    8. kandarp26

      kandarp26 New Member

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      Friend sure you can design a bike but before that you should have a knowledge of stress and material properties.The best way to make your own bike shop is first study the parts which are needed in bike then make a list of it and go to garage or Scrapyard where you can get bike spare parts and things like Engine,Body,Silencer .Now go to market and asked the rate of the spare parts you see in Gar rage.In this ask the rate of Wholesale or in stock so it will be easy for you to purchase a part for your shop and keep Selling price according to market with some marginal difference.I am sure that this way you can set a very well shop.
       
    9. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      yep, 1980 gs850g....
      Practical? NO to by a long shot....
      Functional improvements?.... That was missing from the project plan....
      Purpose?..... Increase cool points and achieve the "can I pull it off" task...

      :D

      Plus with all the weight I removed, improved the intake and exhaust flow, she pulls like a m-f'r.....

      Oh and i'm about 300 bucks out of pocket..

      Thanks for the props.:D
       
    10. RobLittle

      RobLittle New Member

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      Build a bike from the ground up, design and fabricate all of the parts yourself, then create a portfolio of your work (concept sketches, working CAD drawings, machined parts, and photos). Get a job with a real motorcycle company even if they are paying peanuts and learn.Email me and we can talk. I was the new product engineer for Yoshimura Suzuki 95-98 then left and started my own shop.
       
    11. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      Nice input Rob! PM me when you have a chance, I'd like to see some of your stuff.
       

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