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  • motorcycle chain lubrication system

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by niclatrique, Apr 11, 2011.

    1. niclatrique

      niclatrique New Member

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      Hi,

      I'm a hobbyist trying to resolve an issue.

      I love riding my motorcycle but not having to lubricate the chain every 500km. That is for sure I could buy a Cameleon oiler or the Scottoiler which are devices specifically designed for this task. But to my opinion, there is a mojor disadvantage to those systems. They are both gravity based systems. It makes the flowrate of oil to the chain dependable to the temperature as the oil's viscosity chenges much with a few degrees(to my knowledge).

      So, I decided to make my own "super-duper-BMW-chain-luber" !

      You will then wonder (with reason): how Nicolas are you going to solve that flowrate issue ?
      Well, my answer to this is why not install a pumped oil system ?

      So here is the purpose of this thread.

      As it's a DIY or hobby project, it has to be a really low cost oiler. At least, a way cheaper than commercial systems like the Cameleon and the scottoiler. Cameleon = 180$; Scottoiler = 130$)

      Then I imagined how to do the mechanical part of it. There is PLAN A and PLAN B.

      PLAN A:
      A small reservoir of oil feeds a 1/8"OD tube to the chain through a miniature positive displacement pump (preferably a gear pump). The pump will be controlled by a microcontroller.

      PLAN B:
      Take a 60ml syringe and fit a threaded rod in the middle of it. The threaded rod would go through the plunger and nut. A small 12Vdc or stepper motor would be atttached to the end of the syringe. So, at each motor pulses the rotating rod would for force the plunger to go down and the oil to be delivered.

      QUESTIONS TO PLAN A:
      Do you know where I could find a micro-tiny-miniature gear pump at an inexpensive price ? And as I said, it has to be at a cheaper price than the comercially available oiler. Ho please do not tell me to do a search on Google because there is plenty of them ! Well, you may be right, but I just don't know where to look. I've seen nicely made pumps but they are all medical or NASA grade stuff.

      QUESTIONS TO PLAN B:
      This plan could be done with off the shelf components at very low price. My main concern about it is the sealing of the rod going through the plunger. How can I actually seal the threads to prevent the oil moving from the wet side to the dry side of the syringe.

      So if any of you has a great'n'cheap idea, then I would be pleased !

      Regards,

      Nicolas
       
    2.  
    3. bjp

      bjp New Member

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      Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2016
    4. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      Excellent idea. One question though -- can the user select the type of lubricant and the flow rate at which it is applied. Would it work in an industrial warm, vibration environment. What is thesource for this device in the USA

      Source
       
    5. LinkedIn Gopher

      LinkedIn Gopher Little furry chap

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      No idea, but I would have thought that the Lube selection will be determined by the valve size, viscocity of lube (dependant on the temperature, heat transfer from friction and local heat sources) and ammount of pressure head in the reservoir. So to a degree there must be some ability to select to a lubricant.

      As for an industrial warm vibration environment, I guess that depends on the design, wheter it is sealed around the chain, or sprayed on from a distance (I would think it is sealed on a motocycle, to save the riders leg from oil)

      Source
       
    6. RGV250

      RGV250 New Member

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      Hi Nocolas,
      Sounds like you have exactly the same idea as me, I just want to do it as an excercise.
      I have found some pumps I have bookmarked but not got round to looking at yet so they may or may not be fit for the purpose.
      http://www.elitemodelsonline.co.uk/Prod ... or-L-IP155
      http://www.elitemodelsonline.co.uk/Prod ... -Fuel-Pump
      http://www.elitemodelsonline.co.uk/Prod ... -Gear-Pump
      http://www.oilybits.com/miniature-gear- ... d_311.html
      http://www.oilybits.com/pumps/lvm-amazo ... d_127.html

      I did try one from here but found it did not really work with oil, nice pump though.
      http://www.micropumps.co.uk/TCSM200range.htm

      Hope it helps,
      Bob
       
    7. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      The first question which nobody is asking is: How much oil needs to be dispensed? And how often? Continuously? Or one drop (how big a drop?), say, every x number of miles? Or x number of engine revolutions? Then the oil type, which affects the pump choice (effects on seals, etc.).

      How about this: A small piston and cylinder, on a vertical axis, in the bottom of the reservoir. A spring loaded check valve lets oil out of the cylinder, down to the chain, when the piston is depressed by a solenoid. Another check valve, possibly inside the piston, lets oil into the cylinder as the piston retracts, or use a cup seal that only seals in one direction (like a tire pump). Since the piston and cylinder are in the reservoir, a good seal is not required. Activate the solenoid on a time interval, or by counting revolutions.


      Or how about a real cheap solution? Get one of those lawn mower primer pumps (the little rubber "button" bulb. Connect it to the reservoir, and give it a little squirt each time you ride, or once a week, or whatever. If you want, let the pump push it into a smaller reservoir that will drip onto the chain over several minutes (the flow rate is not critical here), to coat the entire chain.
       
    8. RGV250

      RGV250 New Member

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      Hi Dana,
      In answer to one of your questions, the quantity is very small, maybe 1ml for a second through a very fine nozzle and then not again for 100 miles or so (or at least that is what I was working on).
      I think the pump will have to be PWM controlled to get the flowrate right down although I have found that rate with oil is by far less than that quoted with water.
      One oiler I have seen uses a positive displacement pump which is ideal but as Nicolas has pointed out they are not cheap if you can find them.
      I have thought about looking for a cheap windscreen washer pump just to see the effect that has, that way if it does not work or the oil ruins it I have not lost a lot.

      Regards,
      Bob
       
    9. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      That's why I suggested a single shot of fixed displacement (you could have a screw adjustment to the piston travel), then if it drips onto the chain over a second or a minute it doesn't matter; you've dispensed the correct amount of oil.
       
    10. Harshad

      Harshad Member

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      Dear Bikers,

      Why so deep thinking and analysis required? why we need size of drops and pump capacity?? It is not at all something so serious. Sorry, but I believe this. I respect your knowledge.

      Put one oil container may be of 100ml. pointing exactly on first top chain link contact with rear chain sprocket (i.e. upper quadrant of rear chain sprocket if you see bike from side.)

      Provide one spring loaded tapper pin pointing towards inner side of container.when u push pin down, it will generate some opening at container mouth. We need very less space for oil to come out. container mouth will have matching taper hole to suite pin. Pin may have grove for seal assembly on it.

      Attach pin end to wire and provide lever for pulling wire and thus pin at appropriate region on rear shockers.When ever shockers will move up and down it will keep on just release drop of oil on chain.

      Regards,
      Harshad
       
    11. OllieT

      OllieT Member

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      I think everyone has so many questions because of whether something like this is needed in the first place. If the chain on a motorcycle only needs a drop of oil every 100 miles, then why not just oil it every 500 miles or whatever. Do the motorcycle chain oil evaporate or break down off the chain over time? I think the question I would be asking is what causes the chain to need to be oiled every 100 miles in the first place? Is there a way to reduce the time between oiling the chain? If you do create a dispenser of some sort, then you will want to experiment with the hole size of the dispenser. The first step is to figure the average temperature of the oil chamber. You will want to probably attach it to a part of the motorcycle engine that has a fairly constant temperature. Once you figure the temperature out, then you can test the nozzle sizes while heating the oil to the proper temps and seeing which one releases the correct amount of oil. But then on top of that, you have to figure out the average speed of the motorcycle through normal driving situations. The reason is that you have the issue with the chain only needing so much oil every 100 miles on average. So when the oil is up to temp from riding the motorcycle, then on average how long will it take to reach 100 miles?

      I guess that's why everyone is asking questions because controlling the amount of oil is important. Too much and you're wasting the oil and perhaps dirtying up your pants or the motorcycle from flying excess chain oil.
       

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