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    Discussion in 'Help, info & forum announcements' started by elhjelmo, Dec 2, 2015.

    1. elhjelmo

      elhjelmo New Member

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      Hello everybody I am Christina, I am new to this forum and I could need some guides in an old exam question. The thing is that I have an old exam left to do. And I have on old exam to practice on/ an old exam. The thing is that I don’t have the right answer to the question and I am a bit rust.
      I am a bit insecure in this question/the outcome. And need some other opinions other than my one. My professor has not answer me so I have to tur to other solutions.

      I am pretty sur that I have the 3 first slowed,
      Should Shoe minimum temperature change under transient heat exposure= Thermal conductivity
      Must be light and stiff= Young`s modulus
      Should not break when dropped= Fracture toughness
      Then on the rest I get a bit insecure, some that can give me an insight or something.
      [​IMG]
       
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    3. CPPMable

      CPPMable Well-Known Member

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      This is actually a very good question. You need to understand the definitions of the properties pretty well. Cool question never seen it asked like this and I like it.

      Can you have more than one answer per box? Young's modulus is not a unit of measure of weight so it would define the light parameter.

      Also, I don't think all the properties are listed here for you. What is the difference between strong and stiff in those two questions? Stiff, I agree would be a represented by young's modulus. But strong depends on the design requirements I would say most appropriate and probably the answer the Prof wants is Ultimate Strength but I think Yield strength would be more appropriate since most products are designed not to yield.
       
    4. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      I think each answer can accept more than one property. Light and strong, properities of interest are: density and ultimate tensile strength.
       
    5. Chriswolfgram

      Chriswolfgram New Member

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      Great questions w/ mutiple correct answers for each number!

      Christina,
      A great Materials Science question. I struggled a little bit with this subject in Uni-school too but no worries, you will be more comfortable with these concepts as time goes on, I assure you. :eek:-->:cool:

      Looks like Question 3, 7, and 8 could be answered with ductility, toughness and fracture toughness (not sure if there is a real difference between the last two). Ductulity works because the questions do not mention anything about deforming the part, just breaking and fracture as the type of failure.

      If you have any specific trouble with answering any one of these, I might be able to help with my many years or aerospace experience and hopefully an understanding or comprehension of what I think the test writer is looking for as the correct answer(s). It might help you with a good well reasoned argument to get at least partial credit on the exam. :confused::mad:;)

      Chris Wolfgram
       
    6. elhjelmo

      elhjelmo New Member

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      it think I don’t know how the exam or the correction of it is supposed to be, but ass you are saying there are 2 or more properties’ that I need to have in consideration. I think that if you write on of the 2 properties’ that fits, it is ok. because if you want more than one answer their would be another answering box.
       
    7. Bumo

      Bumo New Member

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      @elhjelmo #4 must be light and strong=specific strength
       

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