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  • Orthographic views - completing missing views?

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by eterna, Mar 6, 2013.

    1. eterna

      eterna New Member

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      Hi, sorry for this very basic question.
      I have just started my course and having some trouble on something that's sure to be a required skill as I progress.

      http://i1097.photobucket.com/albums/g357/princejan7/drawing_zpsa88da06b.png



      About all I can do is block out the depth and width of the top view, and then I just get confused as to actually projecting the features from the side and front views to the missing top view. Does anyone have some resources to share? :(

      Is there a general procedure to approaching these problems?
       
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    3. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      In the right view project a vertical line up from the front of the part.

      In the top view project a horizontal line to the right from the front of the part

      At the intersection of those two lines draw a 45 degree line up and to the right.

      Now to locate any intermediate feature of the part, you project a line vertical from the front view.

      From the right view you project a line vertical to the 45 degree line then horizontal from the 45.
      Where the two lines meet in the top view is the location of the feature.
       
    4. eterna

      eterna New Member

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      I think that's what I find difficult: how to locate a feature on both the views.

      For example, for the slope on the side view, I don't know which line in the front view corresponds to it.
      If I did, I could just do as you said(intersection of their lines)
       
    5. Julian Harding

      Julian Harding New Member

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      For a beginner an awkward shape, it has a triangular projection that is cut off with an angled face. Try something simpler, and try to visualise the 3d object; this is something that can be difficult but comes with time and practice - does your school have wooden models that you can hold, rotate, and look at from different sides?
       
    6. gfought

      gfought New Member

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      Erich is right on track...it takes practice...stick with it.

      [​IMG]
       
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    7. gfought

      gfought New Member

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      I would also like to add...it may be very helpful to develop the ability to make a 3D sketch of the object. Look at what is given, and begin to imagine its geometric shape. Sketching is enormously helpful in helping your mind begin to "see" the object. Once you have that, you can rotate it in your mind, helping with the development of any view. The orthographic projections are very important in describing the part, and visualization is an important skill to develop in yourself.
       
    8. jerzah

      jerzah New Member

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      Isometric view

      Can you please send a reply of the isometric views of these problems. :D Thanks!
       

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