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  • Part Numbering and configuration management.

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by mvalenti, Dec 11, 2012.

    1. AndrewNew

      AndrewNew Well-Known Member

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      I've gone for a sequential part numbering system for my stuff. I've never really liked "intelligent" part numbering systems, possibly because I am not intelligent enough to remember what all the sub-numbers mean, and don't like having to try and classify parts and assemblies before I've even started work. PDM systems mean parts and assemblies are easy to find if the part descriptions are well chosen, and PDM doesn't have to be complicated. I use a spreadsheet for mine. Intermediate drawings (blank cutting with machining allowance, final machining, finishing etc) are done using part configurations. I appreciate this might not work so well for large organisations with lots of engineers and other staff needing to generate parts but it works well for me.
       
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    3. trevorlye

      trevorlye New Member

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      Stick with sequential numbering

      I agree Andrew. A simple sequential numbering system works best for me. A spreadsheet to record the number and a reasonable description.

      In the past I have used a combination of the two. The first two digits to determine roughly were the part is located, the next four digits was the project number and the rest of the number was sequential. This was an issue when using parts in multiple projects. The only place I can think intelligent part numbers work is when there are a lot (100s) of simple configurations or a part or assembly, like a screw or pneumatic fitting.


       
    4. riggelpop

      riggelpop New Member

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      The company I work for uses a rather complicated but very effective system for numbering parts. The reason for this is we store everything on a Windchill server which does not allow anything to have the same number regardless of which folder it is in. First everything is divided into 4 subgroups, and this is because we have a large amount of both R&D work as well as finished products: Experimental (EXP), Production (PRO), Proposal (P), and Standard parts which have no abbreviation. Then everything is divided into 5 groups:

      1: An individual mechanical or electrical piece part drawing.


      2: A schematic, drawing tree, Indentured Drawing List (IDL), flowchart or other 2D
      drawing (on drawing format).


      3: A sub-assembly drawing

      4: All Tooling: A manufacturing, test or assembly jig or fixture including ground
      handling fixtures (piece part, inseparable assembly, or assembly).

      5: An assembly drawing.

      After that everything is given a (3 digit) project number and then the last 4 digits are a sequential number pulled from that project list.

      For example:

      EXP-50690003 Would speak to an experimental assembly from the 069 project, and it is the 3rd creation in that project.

      Again it is a bit complicated to effectively learn, however once everyone has it down it becomes very easy and efficient to work with.
       
    5. naharris

      naharris New Member

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      This has been a useful thread for me as I am in the same position of having to develop a numbering system for an organization that formally bought everything. Now that engineering is in-house I have several challenges to contend with. In addition to part numbering, I must now develop 1st article and incoming inspection criteria. File management will also be an issue because of managements lack of experience with these issues. The organization really needs a dedicated PDM but the impression is that SAP is sufficient.
       
    6. maze03079

      maze03079 New Member

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      "Smart" Part Numbers don't have to be complicated ... start off small. Pick your main categories first ... Catalog Numbers (sellable items), Main Assemblies, Sub-assemblies, Fabrication Parts, PCB Assemblies, Hardware, Component Specification (off-the-shelf parts), Miscellaneous, etc. After the main-categories have been decided upon, then everything else can be sequentially assigned.The more "intelligece" you try to build into the P/N scheme, the more complicated you make it.But this is just my opinion.
       
    7. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      This is what we came up with....

      ###-##### General format, the first 3 #'s are descriptive prefix, and the last 5 #'s are purely sequential.

      100- Assy/Subs
      110- Spares/Kits
      120- Electrical Schematics
      130- Pneu/Hyd Schematics
      200- MFG Parts (our parts)
      300- Hydraulic/Pneumatic spec sheets
      310- pneumatic cyl
      320- pneumatic Valves
      330- pneumatic seals
      340- pneumatic fittings

      etc.... you get the idea..... Thanks everyone for chiming in.
       

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