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  • PDF revision organization ideas

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by topher5150, Aug 1, 2016.

    1. topher5150

      topher5150 Member

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      So when I got hired back in September of '15 one of my main tasks was to organize the drawing libraries, which include the .asm, .drw, .prt along with the pdf, and dxf files. All the Solidworks files are for me, and me alone so they don't really care about that. The pdf's and the dxf's are what we use for customers, sales, and manufacturing, and this all outside of the Solidworks PDM on a shared drive. So I'm coming to you guys for some simple ideas that I can present to the powers that be for revised drawing organization.
       
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    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Are you looking for a software suggestion, or something like a drawing number scheme?
       
    4. topher5150

      topher5150 Member

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      some type of numbering scheme. A way to keep things organized through out the development process
       
    5. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      A lot depends on what kind of drawings you make, for what kinds of parts and/or assemblies. I prefer to use a two or three part numbering scheme, which fits well with the kind of work I do (mostly automated production machinery these days). The first part is a unique 6 digit ID that's assigned by our document management software. Then a dash, and then a structured 3 or 4 digit number that indicates what section of the machine. Numbers ending in "00" are major assemblies, and numbers ending in "0" are [usually] subassemblies. In some cases there's another dash followed by additional digits, indicating variations of a part on a single drawing.

      For example, for a current project, an automated assembly machine with 24 separate stations:

      Software assigns "027104" as the basic unique number. The CAD filename then becomes "027104 some machine". This probably doesn't matter to you working alone, but because the software assigns the unique basic number, I then have 1000 numbers that I can use as I please, without worrying about another engineer using the same number because his project will have its own unique prefix.

      There generally isn't an overall assembly drawing, but if there was it would be 027104-0000. Major components on the main assembly might be 027104-0001, -0002, etc. The nest assembly on the main dial is 027104-0010, with details -0011, -0012, etc.

      The station 1 assembly drawing would then be 027104-0100. Station one details would be 027104-0101, -0102, -0103, etc. There might be more than 10 details, in which case -0110 is just another detail, or -0110 might be a smaller subassembly, in which case its details would be -0111, -0112, etc. Note that not all numbers need to be used, for example the -0100 assembly might have only 7 details, in which case there is no -0108 or -0109, or all the rest of the numbers up to -0199 might be unused (nothing we do has that many components),

      Similarly, station 2 assembly is 027104-0200, with details 0201, 0202, etc. Station 3 might be an empty station, in which that block simply isn't used. The scheme continues up through assembly 027104-2400. Then -25xx might be used for other things, like a subassembly not part of any individual station, or a common subassembly used on several different stations. Or I might make the generic subassembly 027104-9900, it really doesn't matter.

      In my consulting days, instead of the six digit base number, I used an alphanumeric prefix... two letters indicating the customer, followed by one or two digits indicating which project, e.g. BD4-100 would be the assembly drawing for the 4th project for Black & Decker, perhaps with -200 and -300 subassemblies, and BD4-001 through -099 might be reserved for proposal drawings or concept layouts.

      Finally, I add an optional second dash number for variations. It might be simple as 027104-1706-R and -L for RH and LH versions of the same part (which is the sixth drawing for station 17), or it might be a post with different lengths expressed in thousandths, i.e. 027104-0013-1025 is 1.025 inches long, while 027107-0013-0997 is exactly the same but 0.997" long). Or it might be -A or -S for aluminum and steel versions of the same part.

      This makes it easy to keep track of things, somebody calls me to ask about drawing 027104-0609, I know right away it's the station 6 assembly. The thing is to create a general framework, but not get too crazy or worry if it breaks down in some areas. Parts from one station might get reused on another (or another machine), and that's just expected.
       
    6. SaitaMa Design

      SaitaMa Design Member

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      SolidWorks EPDM gives a revision letter by default when you approve a filetype (.sldprt, .slddrw, .sldasm, .pdf, .cdr, .ai and other files you have allowed to take revisions when approved). What I do in the company I work for, is after the approval I create the pdf and dxf drawing, with the filename to be <PartNo>-RA, <PartNo>-RB, etc.
      This can be managed easily outside PDM, but be aware for the double names.
       

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