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  • Prototyping a stainless steel pressed part (deep drawn?)

    Discussion in 'Prototyping & low-volume processes' started by TedRogers321, Nov 18, 2009.

    1. TedRogers321

      TedRogers321 Member

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      I would like to prototype a deep drawn part from 1.5mm thick 304 Stainless Steel. It measures approximately 300mm x 300mm x 30mm deep with a rim all around it – just like a baking tray! There are also some text and other features (a brand logo) that need to be bashed into the main bottom face.

      Any ideas how to prototype such a part cheaply? I’m worried this could get expensive. :eek:
       
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    3. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      Good afternoon,

      Typically when people say prototype, and cheap, I tend to cringe. The first question I ask is what is the prototypes purpose? This will then begin to direct me on helping them get what they want. So, what is the intention of this prototype?

      -Mark
       
    4. TedRogers321

      TedRogers321 Member

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      :D :lol: :lol:
      Basically I want it to be in Stainless steel because it's tough. It's a cover for an outdoor enclosure that might get knocked around. The features are for branding... just want it to be as close to the final design as possible for mechanical testing and for marketing to look at.
       
    5. mvalenti

      mvalenti Well-Known Member

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      In my opinion, I would approach this in 2 ways. For marketing, make an SLA, logo is incorporated, and paint it. Dont raise your eyebrow, look at a company called Alsa Corp, and see what they do with paint. :D And for the prototype for testing, have a good sheet metal shop fabricate one up for you, I think the cost and turn around time would be much less than getting one drawn or stamped. Not knowing your budget, I would think that the tooling involved would be expensive. Also, you mention it is tough, its also heavy, but so are some plastics that could be pressure formed. Logos could be incorporated in the forming step as well. Just some things to think about. Let me know how you make out.


      -Mark
       
    6. bcao

      bcao Member

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      If you are using it for cosmetics but also need to contain EMI or maintain IP6X environmental compliance, I would recommend welding it from sheet metal for your prototype.

      Otherwise, you will have some level of tooling cost. If you weld stainless, you can still get a nice cosmetic surface.

      For
       

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