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  • reciprocating air compressor

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by durrani, Mar 18, 2014.

    1. durrani

      durrani Member

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      compressor run on which cycle. is it rankine cycle.
       
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    3. eckcop

      eckcop Member

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      Rakine cycle is steam engines, etc.
       
    4. maniacal_engineer

      maniacal_engineer Well-Known Member

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      A compressor isn't a cycle, sinc ethe compressed air can be used for any number of things. Compression is a process, usually approximated as adiabatic isentropic (pv^k= constant, k=gamma=Cp-Cv=1.4 for air)
      Actual compression is not actually isentropic, so you end up (I think) at either a lower pressure, a higher temperature, or both, compared to an ideal process with the same work input.
       
    5. durrani

      durrani Member

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      i read in a book that steam engine run or works on modified rankine cycle. then when i reach compressor. i read that compressor run on rankine cycle. the thing where i stuked , is free air delivery.
      when intake conditions or suction conditions r similar to FAD than numericals are simples. but when inlet conditions r different than FAD (15 degree centigrade and 1.013 bar) than numericals become lenghty and little difficiult.
       
    6. maniacal_engineer

      maniacal_engineer Well-Known Member

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      See, a cycle implies that you end up where you started. a compressor you end up with compressed air, not with what you started. A compressor does one part of a cycle, and compression is part of the Rankine cycle. compression is usually modeled as adiabatic isentropic, but in reality is not isentropic. And then once the air is compressed it has arrived at a higher temp and that higher temp is gradually lost by heat transfer to the surroundings. But that is still not a cycle.
       
    7. durrani

      durrani Member

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      what is free air delivery
       

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