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  • SolidWorks or Catia

    Discussion in '2D and 3D CAD general discussion forum' started by jkf1192, May 15, 2012.

    1. vjay

      vjay New Member

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    3. rzki55

      rzki55 New Member

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      my advice to you is begin learning SOLIDWORKS in your school and with tutorial DVD and "go design" series from solidworks website, like that for just few months you will learn almost the tools of making parts to the complex assembly to the essentials of simulation..then jump to catia and you will learn it in least of month..may god bless you.
       
    4. bstclair

      bstclair Member

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      I agree with other replies. I've used AutoCad, SolidDesigner, Solidworks, I-Deas, NX, and now CreoPro (formerly ProEngineer). Once you learn your first CAD program and the lingo associated with it then the rest are all fairly similar. It is simply a matter of learning a new software's interface.
      As was also stated and more specific to your question, Solidworks is easier to use but typically used in a small shop environment for basic to intermediate complexity designs, although I am sure they would tell you it's more powerful than that. Catia is more complicated to learn but definitely has some more advanced features, particularly it is known for it's surfacing capability. Hence it's use in aerospace and like industries where complex surface profile accuracy is desireable.
       
    5. Arunmech11

      Arunmech11 New Member

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      Hello friends, I need the tutorials for pro/e wild fire 5.0. Pls send me the tutorials to [email protected]
      Pls send me as soon as possible...
       
    6. a4niko

      a4niko Member

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      Hi every body

      i know a little about catia that i learnt it at university but at work i dont have enough skill to draw a 3d part .
      Now I want to learn a software for drawing 3D part at my factory , the problem is i dont know with my little information on Catia which is better to learn. I start learning solidworks or Catia? which can be learn faster?

      Thanks in advance
      Mary
       
    7. Bob_S

      Bob_S Member

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      It depends on the industry you are interested in.

      if you are thinking of the larger multinationals, then CATIA is probably preferred, though Siemens UGNX is the alternative at that level.

      In the Mid Range, and covers a lot of industrial stuff that isn't mega-projects like aircraft and automotive, then you're looking at SolidWorks or as an alternative perhaps SolidEdge or Inventor. Inventor is generally used by companies that have migrated from AutoCAD, and hence has a loyal following there. SolidWorks targets AutoCAD users as a prime customer for their software, with some notable success.

      After those four you can take your pick, there are numerous applications to choose from, including Creo (which also has it's loyal fans - but seems to be declining to me) through the multitude of others. No doubt someone will mention IronCAD because of it's versatility and functionality - but this is a personal choice!

      All have 2D as part of the drawing process, I wouldn't even think of learning a 2D package in this day and age as the prime software, although, to be fair, the users that have come through the 2D route, tend to have a better mindset when it comes to drawing production.

      Learning curves are a good talking point. Every single one is the same, yet different. There is a belief that if you know one package, you can quickly get up to speed on another. Although this is basically true in terms of the designing in 3D concept, the different procedures between the packages, to say nothing of the different icons and command s process, makes this a little trickier than an outsider would have you believe. If you can get the training/manual/information to assist transition, then it's easier than whe you first learn it from scratch - it's the way the program operates that takes the time on the migration learning curve.
       
    8. graphcomnsk

      graphcomnsk Member

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      Any Sofware Learning Process

      Dear Friends,
      Your decision for learning CAD software is going to be grate and will realize my view after 2/3 moths from now. Best way to learn any software is to follow tutorials developed by the software company. First thing your have to remember is CAD is tool which helps engineers to draw their concept sketch in reality. Take any software and stick to it for at least one year. Don't just keep on trying different option for the same application. Once you completely understand one software then learn other software. The difference between them you will understand yourself.
      So start the process of learning, your time starts now.
      Best wishes,
      Mahesh Deshmukh
      [[email protected]] .....
      https://www.box.com/mechdesign ....
      https://www.facebook.com/MechanicalDesignAndDraftingServices
       
    9. marsh8128@sbcglobal.net

      [email protected] New Member

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      I started with CAD (AutoCAD 2D) in 1978. In my position every available CAD program was evaluated & benchmarked (time per given task, ease of use, ability of program). True, this was a long time ago, but learned at that time was the need to establish what criteria was to be handled by any of the highlighted programs. Back then there was hardly any contest, because AutoCAD was establishing themselves by providing most learning institutions with training packages, & training any teacher desiring it. This gave them a big "foot-up" over all competition. However, they were quickly eclipsed by offerings from ProEngineer, CompuGraphics, & a few others. But, as quick as they appeared on the scene, most began to fall by the wayside because the few that thought thru their strategy of exposure, presentation & support began to be the desired choices.

      I can't speak too much about CATIA, but Solidworks has always been a great program to work with. Its had great support, its intuitive (easy to pick-up w/o formal training), has myriad "user groups" that contributes to your adaption of their program, plus you learn the shortcuts & deficiencies, as most current programs have. I don' care how good any individual is with a particular program, there'll be someone else that can make another comparable program perform as well. The secret is usage. The more familiar you become with it, the better performer you'll be with that particular program.

      I don't know if AutoCAD has solved their blunder of about 10+ years ago when they offered their 3D Cad programs- Mechanical Desktop & Inventor, that were incompatible with all their previous file structure. You would think if you had purchased earlier versions of AutoCAD that the more recent offerings would step right in-line with existing document files, but that wasn't the case.

      Conversion programs- IGES, STEP, TIFF, & others, have bridged the gap somewhat, but haven't closed the gap completely- to my knowledge.

      ProEngineer got industry started in 3D modeling & solids creation, but were tremendously expensive, although well supported. Solidworks saw the need for a desktop version that could be accommodated with moderate cost, high-end PC's, that was expandable to fit an individuals or company's needs.

      Hope this helps.

      Mike Marsh
       
    10. andrew_neil

      andrew_neil Active Member

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      I think SolidWorks is the better option.
       
    11. amores-design

      amores-design New Member

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      Hello, At the end, all the solids parametrics programs make the same thing, but Catia it is a lot but I complete when you have to design a car or an airplane, if it is not this way, in 90% of the cases Solidworks will serve you, also Solid Edge or Pro-Engineer.

      This depends of if you already have many projects drawing in 2D with AutoCAD or not, if it is this way, the best program is Solid Edge and Solidworks with difference.
       

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