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  • Specifying & Sourcing Mechanical Parts - gears, chains, frames, bearing, springs....

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Ste_Mulv, Jul 1, 2013.

    1. Ste_Mulv

      Ste_Mulv Member

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      Hi everyone,

      I have not looked as moving part, mechanical design since university and could do with some help.

      Over the last few months, I have designed on paper a new product that I would like to prototype. It requires a lot of moving parts, gears, springs etc. It is kind of a combination of a small rollercoaster and conveyor belt system about the scale of a small van with the lifting capacity to move about 30kg units around.

      My problem is I have no idea where I can source these types of mechanical parts. I assume that by finding a supplier, I will find specification guides and their relevant standards, however we all know assumption is the source of most mistakes!

      I am looking for suppliers of gears, chains, wheels, bearings and extruded modular metal frames to build it all out of. I have had a look on RS, but not really sure what I need to search for, so a company that I can contact to discuss would be great or a guide to specifying and finding the manufacturers.

      Thanks for reading, and help will be very much appropriated!

      Steve
       
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    3. vidgolob

      vidgolob Active Member

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      Before you even find a supplier, you must first know what kind of forces your moving parts, gears and springs will be dealing with. For these calculations you can use any kind of mechanical enineering books that are on the market ( but i do suggest that you do not order online - find a book and see if it contains the calculations and/or examples you need ). This is what the supplier will want to know - what kind of force, how much force, and so on. If you leave that up to the supplier, youre just asking for trouble. Also, dont expect suppliers specification guides to have all your answers ( sometimes they do, but you have to know exactly what you are looking for ) or all of the relevant standards ( which you must buy to use, and therefore are not in every suppliers publication ).When you have all the information, just use Google and find a supplier that has a store/warehouse near by ( proximity really helps, especialy if you dont know if what you are ordering is really what you need or if there is a big chance you will have to replace some of the ordered parts or take a look at a part to see if it fits with the other parts. Also working this out with someone in person could be best for you ).
      Since you are doing this for the first time, I expect you will run into some kind of trouble along the way - just dont give up and keep on going. You will learn a lot.
       
    4. vic.blackall

      vic.blackall Well-Known Member

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      There are two ways that you can tackle your design. You can design every part of your assemble, size items where necessary through calculation and then do the detail drawings for manufacture. Bearings, springs etc: can be bought from stockists. The other method, mostly used in prototype work is to use standard components from manufacturers catalogs. You will have a rough idea of your requirements from your basic design which you will then need to adjust,size space etc: to accommodate bought out components. Suppliers of standards range, gears, timing pulleys, belts, chains, springs, etc: can be found by sourcing the internet. More specialist items will most certainly need to be manufactured and for this you will need fully dimensioned manufacturing drawings. Work through your design thoroughly and double check size's and calculations before ordering parts because this is the expensive part, mistakes on paper are easy to rectify once you start cutting metal then it costs time and money. Good Luck. .
       
    5. vic.blackall

      vic.blackall Well-Known Member

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      There are two ways that you can tackle your design. You can design every part of your assemble, size items where necessary through calculation and then do the detail drawings for manufacture. Bearings, springs etc: can be bought from stockists. The other method, mostly used in prototype work is to use standard components from manufacturers catalogs. You will have a rough idea of your requirements from your basic design which you will then need to adjust,size space etc: to accommodate bought out components. Suppliers of standards range, gears, timing pulleys, belts, chains, springs, etc: can be found by sourcing the internet. More specialist items will most certainly need to be manufactured and for this you will need fully dimensioned manufacturing drawings. Work through your design thoroughly and double check size's and calculations before ordering parts because this is the expensive part, mistakes on paper are easy to rectify once you start cutting metal then it costs time and money.

      Steve, I see that you are from London, there are many suppliers in and around London. Good Luck. .
       
    6. Ste_Mulv

      Ste_Mulv Member

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      Hi guys,

      That is very helpful, thank you for your time!

      just about to start looking for a book/mech Eng handbook that will help me size the equipment based on my basic force calculations, however does anyone have a recommendation?

      at uni, I only bought the electrical and electronic books, and I haven't got my notes available easily. I will get google-ing then pop along to a book store to see the book before I buy.

      thanks again!

      steven
       

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