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  • Spray Bar Design (Flat Flan Pattern)

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Michael B., Apr 27, 2015.

    1. Lochnagar

      Lochnagar Well-Known Member

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      Hi Michael,

      I just thought I would give you a picture of the arrangement of the nozzles in a "conventional" spray bar system - whereby you can see the "fans" overlap (which is good practice - to get good coverage)- and to do this the slots in the fans are slightly inclined to the axis of the spray bar - as can be seen in the picture - in the link below. If the jets "collide" - you usually just get a big dribble at the collision point.
      I haven't used "deflected nozzles" - but I imagine you have to set the vertical elevation of the neighboring nozzles at different heights - to avoid a collision of the neighboring jets. However, maybe your supplier can advise you on this.

      http://www.bete.co.uk/spray-nozzle-applications/coating/spray-angles

      Hope this helps.
       
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    3. Michael B.

      Michael B. Member

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      Thank you again. I knew about the problem but had not yet found a good solution. That should be pretty easy to implement.
       
    4. K.I.S.S.

      K.I.S.S. Well-Known Member

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      Hi Michael,
      If you have a thin walled tube, perhaps also consider a 'thermal flow' drill - this is a Tungsten Carbide bit that gets rotated at about 25000rpm and melts its way through the thin wall of the metal, forming a protruding wall in the material. It's normally used when tapping threads in thin section metal sheets is required, but it may work for your application. I haven't tried it, so this is a unqualified suggestion, but it will be relatively simple to grind the bit to your required profile.
      And of course, if it's only sterility you need, as opposed to cosmetic cleaning, just use Ozone.
      Correction - the last time I used one of these was about 25 years ago - the portable drills had this high rpm, but after a quick Google, it seems that the newer workshop drills use a speed of about 3000rpm, but apply more pressure to develop the required friction.
      K.I.S.S.
       
      Last edited: May 2, 2015

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