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  • Stainless steel deep draw

    Discussion in 'Sheet metal' started by Eclat tech solutions, Jul 23, 2010.

    1. Eclat tech solutions

      Eclat tech solutions Member

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      Hi Someone can suggest, whether deep drawing of Stainless steel 1.5 mm sheet for a 150 x 260 mm oval shape to 300mm depth with 40mm radius at bottom is possible or not
       
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    3. ConnectUTS

      ConnectUTS Active Member

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      The simple answer is yes, it is possible to deep drawing some types of stainless steel to draw ratios in excess of 200% (150mm wide x 300mm deep). You need

      1. A vendor who does this type of deep drawing routinely
      2. Most likely need progressive dies
      3. Those dies will be not be inexpensive, so you need to confirm that your final production quantities can afford the cost of those dies.
      4. You will need to identify the correct alloys.
       
    4. ramshanmugaraj

      ramshanmugaraj New Member

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      Hi,

      You may please give more related infomations like what grade of material & etc.

      1) The most important factor for a rectangular / square shape ( other than round ) deep drawing is the "CORNER RADIUS". That will determine the number of draw stages required. As you mentioned, oval shape may be less complicated.

      2) Progressive die may not be suitable for this process, because deep drawing process need slow slide motion, which is normally available with hydraulic press & variable blank holding pressure.

      Regards.

      Shanmugaraj, R
       
    5. Eclat tech solutions

      Eclat tech solutions Member

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      Hi ConnectUTS
      Do you mean stage draws by progressive dies?
       
    6. Strider

      Strider Member

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      Generically speaking anything drawn to more than 1.5 times it's diameter is considered "deep drawn" and can be done in either progressive dies or transfer presses with the latter being preferred. The big difference here is the way the part moves from one set of dies to the next. Getting the parts out of the dies can also be a challenge in prog dies because they run in a more generic press that does not have a "knockout"system under each station the way most transfer presses do.

      Yes, an oval shape can be made to your dimensions but it will require a material that is AKDQ (effectively, material without grain direction due to the more spherical instead of jagged and interlaced microstructure).
       
    7. sday2

      sday2 New Member

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      Dear Shangmugaraj,
      Yes deep drawing usually requires Hydraulic presses, but with the advancing technology it is possible to manufacture deep drawn parts using servo presses. There are advantages and disadvantages to using servo presses compared to Hydraulic presses. The only main disadvantage is the investment cost of the machinery. Hydraulic press' are manufactured by a lot of companies and the technology is an old well known technology. Therefore the prices are competitive and the actual cost of manufacturing a Hydraulic press is very low compared to that of a Servo press. About the advantages, if you have a high volume project that requires Hydraulic press' than Servo press is a go to option. The reasons for it are: fast operation (you can manufacture 6x or more parts using a servo press compared to Hydraulic press) Servo presses also are very flexible. Think of them as eccentric presses that have servo motors instead of flywheels. What servo motor can provide is instant acceleration, deceleration and reverse motion. So you can have a varying ram motion, can run the press in pendulum mode, can do double strike at the lowest dead center and etc. There is a good article that I have found you can read it at http://www.thefabricator.com/article/stamping/the-science-behind-the-servo-press.

      The servo press technology is rather new and it is still developing. The biggest problem with the Servo pres is the cost of the Servo motor. There are few high torque delivering servo motor manufacturers. In order to decrease this servo motor cost this company that I supply clutches to has followed an interesting method and combined servo press and conventional mechanical press. This allows them to use very small servo motors and still get the highly variable ram movements.
      You can find the video of the machine at the link below.
       

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