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  • Stereolithography & 3D Printing

    Discussion in 'Prototyping & low-volume processes' started by Gameface, Mar 6, 2012.

    1. Gameface

      Gameface New Member

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      I work for a glass bottle manufacturing company. Last week I was asked to look into Stereolithography machines. Basically sometimes when developing a new bottle profile with our customers we have 3d models made off the bottles by an external company and sent to the customer so that they can get a feel for the bottle. One of our customers have now mentioned that a competitior has a Stereolithography machine on site that can produce a bottle model overnight or in a number off hours. I have been asked to look into finding out about these and the cost.
      There's lots off websites out there and lots off prices, does anyone out there have either a Stereolithography machine or a 3D pinter, would I be right in saying a 3d printer is cheaper? What price range would you expect to pay for one off these machines and finally anyone the website of a company in Ireland or UK that I can ask for a quote from?
       
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    3. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      Nowadays the focus seems to be on FD (Fused Deposition) systems like Stratasys, sometimes called 3D printers, rather than the older "lasers in liquid resin" stereolithography systems. I believe the Stratasys machines are in the US$30,000 range, but I've seen plans online to build your own system for under $1000.

      Also see MakerBot.
       
    4. daedalus0x1a4

      daedalus0x1a4 New Member

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      Hey there,

      The term "3D printing" generally refers to one of several technologies classified as "Additive Manufacturing". Additive Manufacturing methods create a part by joining material, normally layer by layer, to produce a structure that adheres to the constraints of a 3D model. Think of a someone creating a sculpture by melting together glue with a glue gun. "Subtractive Manufacturing" methods remove material from a piece a piece of work by Milling, Turning, Grinding, etc.

      There are several additive manufacturing technologies currently in use and you should research the different methods and choose one that suites the material you work with most commonly.

      Start by looking at SLS (Selective Laser Sintering), FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling).

      Refer to this Wikipedia article, as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_manufacturing

      I'd advise you start with a small-scale machine to get a feel for the process such as a RepRap or MakerBot like Dana suggested.
       
    5. cwarner7_11

      cwarner7_11 Well-Known Member

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      While RepRap or Makerbot can provide a good introduction to the technology (I am awaiting delivery on my first RepRap machine as I write!), I am not convinced that this technology is going to give you sufficient quality for customer presentations of new ideas for bottle designs. I suspect you will ultimately want something a bit more sophisticated, such as offered by Objet or Z Corp- pricing ranging from teh $25,000 to something in excess of $100,000. Selective Lase Sintering or Stereolithography might be more appropriate for a hoolw bottle design.
       
    6. Julian Harding

      Julian Harding New Member

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      I did own a couple of SLA machines a while back (as well as other printers). Some 3d printers are easy / very design person friendly with minimal effort pre and post printing.
      Sla does sound like the way to go for yourself / type of business – you will be able to get hold of some very nice water clear resins, ideal i would think for glass type products. I prototyped several glass prototype products, with some effort you get good results – effort being post “print” finishing and tnited lacquered.
      Sla does require some specialist post print finishing, including solvent washing, UV final cure etc. You will need additional kit, such as UV filters on any light source, extraction, temp control, and humidity control – a small machine will need the tank filling completely before you are able to use it – resin does not come cheap!
      3d printing is very easy in comparison!

      I have been out of the prototyping game for a while - so won't quote prices - but try 3d systems and envisiontech.
       
    7. jevnyprototype

      jevnyprototype Member

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      The material is limited with SLA/SLS/FDM/3D Printer/

      You need choose the best way according to your drawing,material and surface treatment requiremetns
       
    8. ShoN

      ShoN Active Member

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      Perfactory Envisiontec
       

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