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  • strain gauges bonding

    Discussion in 'Industrial design' started by Haroon, Mar 28, 2016.

    1. Haroon

      Haroon New Member

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      Hi.
      I am a student of Mech Engineering
      i want information from you about starin guages bonding. we are designing an apparatus for combined loading and we need strain gauges for that purpose we have already purchased the strain gauges and now we are searching for its bonding kit and after a long search we are unable to find something less expensive . I would be very thankful if you help us.Please give us an idea that we can implicate for bonding of strain gauges other than bonding kit , becz it will cost us too much if we ordered it online
      also you can tell us if there is a way of buying less expensive kit

       
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    3. Erich

      Erich Well-Known Member

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      In a five minute search of the internet I learned that strain gages can be bonded with two part epoxies or cyanoacrylates. You don't have to buy an expensive kit. Just get one of those types of glues and use it. If you wish to be thorough you would buy a couple of types of glue and install gages with each type. Gather your strain data and compare results to see if you can find a difference due to adhesive.
       
    4. Dedeech

      Dedeech Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      If you still need a solution, you can choose a simple superglue, which you can buy in any vendor. Also you can use epoxy resin adhesive, but if you choose a superglue as option you need to be careful. You choose a superglue if you make a simple experiment on room temperature. If you make experiment under -10 °C and above 100 °C you choose a second option (an epoxy resin, in stick version or in bottle).
       
    5. john12

      john12 Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Yeah, also don't glue your fingers together! I'm sort of joking but it's easier said than done with cyanoacrylates/superglue.
      Also, by the same - if you go to your local Pound Shop/Dollar Store/Daiso usually you can get a multipack of superglue for a buck or two, and it's pretty much the same as the expensive branded stuff.

      During my Final Year design project I used a LOT of superglue to harden 3D printed powder parts and this saved me a lot of money!

      You can also usually find epoxy there too.
       
    6. GoodCat

      GoodCat Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Any highly curable adhesive: сyanoacryad, epoxy, polyamide. Do not forget that the glue suits you according to the operating conditions: temperature range, humidity, resistance to destructive radiation (ultraviolet, high-frequency electromagnetic waves, etc.)
      Do not use polyurethane adhesives or other adhesives that are not fully cured. In this case, your sensor will have an error.
       

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