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  • Tessellated I - my simple technical drawing, coloured artfully

    Discussion in '2D drawings gallery' started by Peter Dow, Dec 25, 2012.

    1. Peter Dow

      Peter Dow Well-Known Member

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      [​IMG]

      View a larger scale version of Tessellated I

      A tessellation of a capital "I" shape employing the colours of the spectrum which I created using Paint.NET the free image and photo editing software which runs on Windows.

      The "I" Shape.
      The "I" shape is square in proportions, with the vertical column one third the width of the square by design. The thickness of the base and top of the "I" are the same thickness and consequently have to be one quarter of the height of the square to tessellate in this precise fashion. The shape of the "I" I arrived at during consideration of one of my engineering design projects.

      The Colours.
      My use of the colours of the spectrum, half of the "I"s Red-Orange-Yellow and the other half Green-Blue-Purple, and the black lines to define the outline of the "I"s was directly inspired from a work of art I found on DeviantArt website, named "Colorful Tessellation" by ~TheShadowRider123, Cori Davis of the United States of America. This work of art is dedicated to Cori with my thanks for the inspiration her work gave me.

      Using Paint.NET I was able to add what I would describe as a "metallic texture" to the colours, although the program function I used is called "Effects - Distort - Dent" by Paint.NET's menus.

      This version of the work has my own watermark added.
       
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    3. Peter Dow

      Peter Dow Well-Known Member

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      Tessellated I / H / 66% colour / Steel

      I note that the imageshack server is refusing to serve one of my images for some unknown reason so here it is again, served from another server.

      [​IMG]

      Rotate by 90 degrees to get "Tessellated H".

      [​IMG]

      Reducing the colour saturation to 66% gives -

      [​IMG]


      Tessellated I in Steel

      [​IMG]

      View larger version of Tessellated I in Steel 1800 x 800

      Representing a surface of "I"-shaped steel tiles or an embossed "I" tessellation pattern in a steel sheet. Produced using Paint.NET.

      The "I" shape is of square proportions, the column of the I being one third of the width of the square and the top and the base one quarter of the height of the square.
       
    4. Peter Dow

      Peter Dow Well-Known Member

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      Now I'd like to revisit the purpose of my technical drawing and I mean specifically the non-artistic purposes.

      From the engineering consideration that typical simple tiles and bricks are far from optimal in terms of adding structural strength to constructions such as buildings, walls etc., I am proposing better-designed more robust, more secure tiles / bricks and I believe that further design developments to the I / H - tile / brick 2-dimensional shape I have suggested here - specifically fleshing out the simple 2-D design into a more detailed 3-D design which introduces further efficient tile-to-tile / brick-to-brick interlocking or making-rigid features is a promising way to go.


      I still need to develop the 3-D design a bit more because I'd want the tiles or bricks to be able to be assembled together then disassembled when necessary without having to be cemented together like a brick wall


      [​IMG]


      and without having to be glued onto a mounting surface like conventional tiles


      [​IMG]


      So I am looking for a design that allows assembly and disassembly such as with Lego, Meccano or many manufactured products which use such typical features as nuts and bolts and bolt-holes but many other variations to secure one part to another strongly but in a reversible and flexible way. The ability to disassemble is particularly useful for temporary structures, as is strength to weight ratio so that the parts of the structure can be moved easily to where they need to be erected.


      [​IMG]


      So I still have some design thinking and technical drawing to do and then I'll need a fabrication plan. Most likely I'll want to make the tiles or bricks out of metal for strength reasons - although for some applications plastics and in particular fiber-reinforced plastics offer very high strength-to-weight ratios and so may be even better. I'll need to start small with models first and then see if anyone else might be interested in applying the design for real engineering applications?
       
    5. Lukas

      Lukas New Member

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      I can just imagine you listening to some Jimi Hendrix in the background :)

      Wasn't quite sure if I understood you correctly.

      [​IMG]

      Is this the kinda thing you meant? Instead of layering the bricks on top of one another, or any other typical arrangement. Have them or possibly concrete blocks in the form of an I section - allowing them to naturally interlock (rigidity?)
       
    6. Peter Dow

      Peter Dow Well-Known Member

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      Go to I or H tiles and bricks for stronger, lighter assembled structures

      Yup that's the idea and sorry I forgot to add a link in this topic in the 2D drawings gallery forum to the associated topic in the main mechanical design forum. So here it is now.

      [h=2]I or H tiles and bricks for stronger, lighter assembled structures[/h]
      Please read that topic and continue discussion there (although I've not done anything with this project recently so have little more to add, except by way of explanation of what I've done already).
       
    7. jorgea

      jorgea New Member

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