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  • torque by manual rotation

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by zubair, Jun 11, 2012.

    1. zubair

      zubair Member

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      Hi! Can anybody tell me please that if a human rotates some thing for example gear manually (by his hand), how high torque can it apply manually. i.e., what proportion of his weight or any thing else?
       
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    3. vidgolob

      vidgolob Active Member

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      As far as I know that depends on the system that enables the rotation. I could be wrong but I think you need to be more specific if you want a better answer.
       
    4. zubair

      zubair Member

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      thanks for your interest. Actually i want to design a manually operated gear mechanism. this shall be driven by hand rotation of screw attached to pinion. I have to put some value of torque in solidedge spur gear designer.
       
    5. Dana

      Dana Well-Known Member

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      The torque a person can produce depends on the length of the lever (crank) arm, whether the person is pushing or pulling, whether they're standing or seated, etc.
       
    6. vidgolob

      vidgolob Active Member

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      Exactly what Dana said. You need to work out your project before you start with modeling, and not the other way around.
       
    7. Ritesh

      Ritesh New Member

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      Hello zubair

      Average human hand can apply 100N force easily. so you can consider F=100N for your calculation.
      and according to this force you can calculate Torque (T=F x R).

      further this torque is also dependent on friction.
       
    8. k_j0nes

      k_j0nes New Member

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      Way too many variables to consider in this example! Add a crank handle to the mechanism to eliminate some of them.
       
    9. reversethrust

      reversethrust Member

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      I read in machine design by Robert Norton that a human force can provide force upto 60 lbf
       
    10. RogersD

      RogersD New Member

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      Check out this page:

      http://www.roymech.co.uk/Useful_Tables/Human/Human_strength.html


      The data on this page details the applied force (mean, range, standard deviation) for both females and males of a particular age range, for various loading scenarios (e.g. turning a circular knob, twisting a lid, etc)

      If you review the related links at the bottom of the page you'll come across more detailed data covering different age ranges and more loading scenarios.
       
    11. zhouya

      zhouya New Member

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      hi,,:pI have looked up.but only find the grip strength(about 350N). i guess that the torque depends on human's wrist force which should be smaller than grip strength(maybe it's 200N), hope helpful.
       

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